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How to Find Happiness: Selections from the Works of Pierre Gassendi (vegetarian), Part 1 of 2

2023-12-04
Език:English
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Reverend Pierre Gassendi (vegetarian) was born in Champtercier in Southeastern France in 1592. He was a philosopher, astronomer, mathematician and Catholic priest. Reverend Pierre Gassendi advocated that the study of nature and science was complementary with the belief in God and the Divine. God’s existence can be proven from the harmony seen in nature itself. He held that happiness is the main goal of human life which can be achieved through peace in the soul and the absence of bodily pain. This was best achieved through adherence of a plant-based diet, the original diet in the Garden of Eden which is best suited to the human anatomy and physiology, as created by God.

Today, it is an honor to present selections from “Three Discourses of Happiness, Virtue, and Liberty – Collected from the Works of the Learn’d Gassendi by Monsieur Bernier,” focusing on “The First Book Concerning Happiness,” chapter 1 “What Happiness Is.”

“And in this sense it is that we usually say, a wise man, though tormented with exquisite pains, may nevertheless be happy; not in a perfect and complete sense, but he may attain to that degree that we call human happiness, which the wise man always enjoys in that measure that the circumstances will permit, because he doesn’t increase his misery, either by impatience, or despair, but rather abates it by his constancy. And by this means he is happier, or to speak more properly, he is less miserable than if he suffered himself to be dejected, as others in like cases, who bear not their misfortunes with the same patience and constancy of mind, and who besides are not supplied with the same encouragements from wisdom as he has; such I mean as an innocent life, and a good conscience void of offence, which always afford great quiet and satisfaction to the mind.”

“Sometimes I sigh and weep, but for all this I am not vanquished, nor overcome, nor do I suffer myself to be transported with despair, which would render my condition much more miserable.”

“Therefore, designing to treat afterwards of happiness, he earnestly exhorts, to consider thoroughly of the things that conduce to it; and because amongst those things the chief is, that the mind may be disengaged from certain mistakes, which cause continual disturbances and vain fears, he mentions several particulars, which he believes to be of that importance, that when well examined, will settle the mind, and procure to it a real and solid happiness.”
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