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Категория : Културни следи по света
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Holy Songs - Bahá'í Prayers

16:08

Holy Songs - Bahá'í Prayers

The Baháʼí faith is one of the fastest growing religions in the world. Founded in the 19th century by His Holiness Baháʼu'lláh in Persia, it is now estimated to have over five million believers all over the world. Bahá means “glory” or “splendor.” There are three central teachings of the Bahá’i Faith, which are the unity of God, the unity of religion, and unity of humankind. Prayers are important to Baháʼí practitioners, as they bring one closer to God.His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son of His Holiness Baháʼu'lláh and the appointed successor, wrote many beautiful and profound prayer verses. Some of these verses have been set to music by the believers. Today we invite you to listen to three uplifting devotional songs by Baha’i inspired performers with lyrics based on prayers by His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá. The first song is called “Waves of the Sea” from the album “Seed” composed by the British composer Richard Leigh. “Waves of the Sea” is a prayer for oneness. Indeed, each of us is a part of the whole; we are connected, united and are one in essence. If more people realize this, there will be more peace, cooperation, and harmony among us all. The next song is called “Aid Thou,” composed and sung by Rebecca Johnston-Garvin from the album "Befriend Me." The lyrics are based on the prayer “On my God, aid Thou Thy servant,” written by His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá. This prayer reminds us that we all rely on the Almighty God to aid and guide us on our spiritual path, to overcome worldly obstacles and to continue to serve Hirm. The last song “Ray of Light” from the album “Temple of Light” is composed and performed by Christopher Faizi. The video shows various Bahá'í Houses of Worship around the world. These uplifting songs inspired by prayers of His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá have certainly brought rays of sunlight into our hearts, encouraging us to strive to be connected with the Divine within.
Културни следи по света
2021-01-27   1111 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-01-27

The Timeless Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright

15:38

The Timeless Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright was one of the most prominent architects in American history. During his lifetime, he designed over 1,000 structures, including churches, schools, museums, and residential houses, eight of which were acknowledged as UNESCO World Heritage Sites in July 2019. Mr. Wright is recognized as “the greatest American architect of all time” by the American Institute of Architects. His design philosophy of “organic architecture” which emphasizes the harmony of human structures and nature, still influences generations today. One of the most famous designs that best exemplifies Mr. Wright’s philosophy is a house called, “Fallingwater.” The most famous one was The Robbie House, built in 1906. Another of his famous designs is the Unity Temple. Frank Lloyd Wright passed away in 1959, but his legacy lives on. The good building is not one that hurts the landscape, but one which makes the landscape more beautiful than it was before the building was built.
Културни следи по света
2020-01-29   1064 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-01-29

Moon Lute – A Traditional Aulacese (Vietnamese) Musical Instrument - Part 2 of 2

16:36

Moon Lute – A Traditional Aulacese (Vietnamese) Musical Instrument - Part 2 of 2

“The advantage of the Moon Lute is in its performance techniques including loud, soft, long, short notes, and fluttering and snapping sounds with significant depth. When playing the Moon Lute, we have to be dedicated, and make an effort to find its unique features. Otherwise, if we just play it casually, then we can’t make use of all the features of the instrument.” “When the Moon Lute is played, it sounds exceptionally beautiful. The artisan who plays the Moon Lute has to express a very strong style. Thus, the lead instrument of a folk musical orchestra must be a Moon Lute.” Mr. Trương Hùng Việt kindly shared with us some of his experiences in making a Moon Lute that meets optimum standard. “In order to produce a Moon Lute, a very special kind of wood is required for the lute to have good sound. Also, that way, the Moon Lute could last up to 100 years. Especially since it is a string instrument, the older it gets, the more wonderful its sound will be. But its special feature is in its neck, which must be made using the old bamboo culm. It does not matter how well a Moon Lute is made, if the bamboo is not old, then the sound can never be lively, but very dull.” Besides its uniqueness as well as its diverse performing techniques, the value of the Moon Lute is based on its ability to improvise many tones skillfullly, from soft, gentle to strong, majestic sounds. Until today, through many trials, The Moon Lute is still very dear to the Aulacese, faithfully conveying people’s feelings through its sounds. The Moon Lute has truly gained a special place in the hearts of art lovers. To conclude our program, we invite you to enjoy the song “To Be Able to Love You,” composed by Supreme Master Ching Hai, with the Moon Lute performance by a traditional folk music group, and illustrated dance by our Association members.
Културни следи по света
2020-07-29   1047 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-07-29

Kashmir: A Paradise on Earth

14:12

Kashmir: A Paradise on Earth

The fourth Mughal Emperor, His Majesty Jahangir, had said this about Kashmir, “If there’s a paradise on Earth, it is this, it is this, it is this.” Kashmir is widely known for its natural beauty and rich culture. Inhabitants of diverse religious backgrounds including Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Christianity coexist amicably and form their own distinct and harmonious community. This melting pot of cultures is based on the centuries-old indigenous tradition, Kashmiriyat, which values tolerance, peace, and cultural harmony. Kashmir is a land of many legends and famous residents. From Emperors, such as Alexander the Great and Ashoka, to scholars, such as Adi Sankaracharya and the mystic Abhinavagupta, Kashmir is indeed home to some incredible individuals. Kashmir’s ancient monuments tell fascinating stories about the region’s history. In the 8th century CE, the Martand Sun Temple shrine was built in honor of the deity, Surya. This monument is one of the largest temples ever built in Kashmir. It has a colonnaded courtyard and a primary shrine in its center that is surrounded by 84 smaller shrines. Nature’s artistic work in Kashmir can best be appreciated in spring, when almond trees blossom together with multi-colored tulips. Kashmir’s alpine meadows also feature an extensive variety of wildflowers. The Himalayan region is referred to as a beauty spot for medicinal and herbaceous flora. The Kashmiri people have splendid and attractive costumes. A Khan dress or Pathani suit with a skull cap is common attire for men. As for women, the Pheran (a loose, knee-length type of cloak) and Shalwar (pants) with the traditional Kasaba (headgear) comprise their popular outfit. With their diverse history and cultural heritage, the Kashmiri people have forged a unique sense of identity that can be explored through their festivals, dances, music, literature, handicrafts, and cuisine.
Културни следи по света
2021-03-24   1046 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-03-24

The iTaukei of Fiji: Islanders with Heart

13:16

The iTaukei of Fiji: Islanders with Heart

Today, we are going to travel to a quintessential tropical island paradise with balmy breezes to learn about an indigenous people whose ancestors came to this beautiful archipelago around 3,500 years ago. Fiji is truly spectacular and features white sand beaches, turquoise oceans, palm trees and fertile land. It’s no wonder the ocean-faring Melanesians, called the Lapita, who found their way to the islands decided to stay and make the archipelago their home. Today, most iTaukei continue to live in their villages with traditional governmental structures. One cultural experience that many tourists enjoy when in Fiji is visiting an indigenous community to observe their way of life. The ancient indigenous Fijians were an ocean-going people who, like many of the Melanesian and Polynesian cultures, built sea-worthy canoes whose capabilities show their civilization had achieved an impressive level of technological advancement. Architecture reveals to us the cultural values, traditions and beliefs of a society. The same can be said of the types of buildings found in Fijian villages, which reflect the influence of communal values that infuse life in Fiji. One of the most important structures is the valenivanua, which is the traditional meeting house or cultural space used by clan heads and the village chief. Meke is storytelling through song, dance and music. For generations, the indigenous Fijians have passed down their history, beliefs, traditions, morals and values through the meke. The Fijian people are as kind, warm and welcoming as their nation’s gentle breezes and tropical waters. May you have the unique opportunity to journey here one day to experience this paradise and the splendid native culture.
Културни следи по света
2020-08-19   1035 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-08-19

Bartering - Exchanging Goods, Services and Friendship

15:40

Bartering - Exchanging Goods, Services and Friendship

Welcome to our program, “Bartering – Exchanging Goods, Services and Friendship.” Bartering was a system of trade introduced by the Mesopotamia tribes dating back to 6,000 BC. The Phoenicians adopted the system to trade goods with other cities across the oceans. An improved bartering system was developed by the Babylonians and was used to exchange goods for food, tea, spices, and other commodities. With the global adoption of a monetary system, simple bartering of goods and services between people is less practiced, but still exists in some parts of the world. In the Koraput region in India where over 48 indigenous communities live, bartering is still a common practice. Many villages in Malaysia still use bartering as their main means of trade. In recent years, bartering is making a comeback in Hawaii where people see each other as part of the ʻohana, or extended family. With this modern bartering system, people are able to trade services, talent and skills. In Africa, certain countries use bartering to help children get an education. In Nigeria, many schools allow parents to trade in used plastic bottles for their children’s school fees under the RecyclesPay Education Project, a campaign by the African Clean Up Initiatives. The barter system is practiced at an international level between large companies and countries using treaties and trade deals to exchange goods and services. It’s the perfect way for companies to clear obsolete or surplus inventory and achieve zero waste. There are many advantages of bartering. It’s economical and saves resources. Something you no longer use may just be the item someone else has been looking for. The exchange is also more direct, immediate, and personal. It’s an opportunity for interaction between people, a chance to form lasting friendships that are much more valuable. Supreme Master Ching Hai once hinted in a lecture in 1992 that one day, the Earth can even barter with beings from other planets…
Културни следи по света
2020-09-09   1028 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-09-09

The Brokpa People - Vegans for Thousands of Years

11:21

The Brokpa People - Vegans for Thousands of Years

The Brokpa are a unique indigenous community mostly living in the Ladakh area of India. They are also known as the Brogpa or Drogpa. They refer to themselves as Minaro, which means “Aryan.” The term Aryan in the ancient Indian language of Sanskrit translates as “distinguished” or “noble” and historically refers to a light-skinned people who spoke an Indo-European language. They entered ancient India and influenced the culture, literature and religion of the locals.One school of thought on their origin posits that the Brokpa people may be descendants of troops that were left behind by Alexander the Great. It has been noted that the Brokpa folk songs describe their migration route that ties in with this theory, and Alexander the Great is believed to have left his troops in Dardistan or modern-day Pakistan. For somewhere between 2,000 and 5,000 years, the Brokpa maintained a strict vegan diet, meaning they excluded animal products including meat, eggs, and dairy. This age-old way of eating is tied to their traditional spiritual beliefs that the world is divided into three different spheres, including a realm of gods, a realm of people and a lower realm consisting of water spirits. The Brokpa belief is that these worlds are connected by a tree that makes communication between them possible. In order to link with the realm of the gods, there is an emphasis on purity. Brokpa women are respected and honored. This is because women have the power of producing life and carrying on the bloodline of the community. As a result of this, they enjoy freedom and mutual respect within their families and villages. During the Bono-na festival, the women dress up in their finest clothing and walk around slowly in a circle performing a courtship dance, at the same time singing folk songs, and calling out to the men to join them. The women also propose marriage. A distinguishing feature of the Brokpa is their love of flowers. The colorful headgear called “tepi” has numerous decorations attached and is adorned with vibrant flowers. Wearing tepi is considered a way to repel evil influences. The women also wear gold, silver, and other metal jewelry, which are not only decorative but also are believed to have protective qualities. The community members also rely on herbal medicine in order to cure their sick.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-21   1022 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-21

Discovering the Community Spirit of the Dani People

12:15

Discovering the Community Spirit of the Dani People

The resourceful Dani people live in the Baliem Valley, located in the Western New Guinea Highlands of Indonesia. Due to the remoteness of this location, the Dani were largely unknown to the rest of the world until 1938. For this community, spirituality is integral to daily life. The Dani believe that we have a soul inside of us, which they call “edai-egen.” Traditionally, the Dani are animistic in their beliefs and believe in water spirits and particular local gods. They also hold ceremonies to honor the spirits of their ancestors, with particular respect given to the paternal lineage. There is a concept called Atou which involves the male descendants inheriting the magic powers of their ancestors related to protecting the garden, preventing and curing disease, and soil fertilization. When it comes to tending the garden, females play a large role in the production of the sweet potato, which is a staple food in the Dani’s diet. Introduced to this area of the world in the 14th century, there is a surprisingly large number of sweet potato varieties that are cultivated. In Dani life, the family unit is close-knit and consists of an extended family. Two or three families usually live together in housing that is surrounded by a fence. The traditional round house is called a honai, and is made with wooden walls, and a grass roof. The shape is a symbolic reminder of maintaining peace among the community members, and the building plans for each house are always checked and considered by the chieftain before being built. In these unique buildings, air vents are strategically placed in the straw roof and wooden walls provide ventilation. Typically, the buildings have no windows in order for occupants to stay warm, and during cold weather, fires are lit to maximize the heat. In Dani society, the role of leadership of the group is held by the chief, or “Ap Kain” who leads the community. The next tier of leadership involves 3 other chiefs referred to as the Ap. Menteg, Ap. Horeg, and Ap Ubaik Silimo. These chiefs own land and fields. The chiefs are male and considered to be strong, honorable and clever.
Културни следи по света
2021-04-07   1017 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-04-07

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 1 of 2

14:46

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 1 of 2

Venezuela is an immigrant based country, consisting of four main ethnic groups: Around 52% of its population are from the Mestizo, a group with a mix of European, Amerindian, and African ancestries; 42 % are of a European descent; 4% are of an African descent; and 2% population are native Venezuelans. The earliest settlers of ancient Venezuela are generally believed to be Siberians who crossed the Bering Strait, connecting Russia and Alaska, during the last glacial period about 23,000 years ago. Though separated into different groups today, DNA research by Harvard Medical School revealed a common ancestry. Their ancestors moved into North America, and then later to Central and South America. Evidence shows that the earliest habitants of northwest Venezuela traces back more than 15,000 years ago. The agriculture system of indigenous Venezuelan was established as early as the 1st millennium. By the end of the 15th century, an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 indigenous people inhabited the current Venezuela region. Today there are 51 indigenous groups currently living in Venezuela, and 44 groups are officially recognized by the government. The largest groups include the Wayuú, Pemón, Warao, Yanomami, and Kariña peoples. The picturesque Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is home to the Pemón tribes. The Pemón's houses are huts with walls made of clay or bark, and roofs made of palm leaves. Besides collecting the food from the wilderness, Pemón men prepare the soil for planting and the women garden, harvest, and transport crops.Pemón's living area, the Gran Sabana, with its gorgeous sceneries, has become a tourist attraction place and provides the main source of income for the locals. For the last three years, while the economy and tourism have been slow, the Pemón people in the Kavanayén village have resisted lucrative offers from the mining industry, and have returned to a more environmentally responsible way of living, with traditional farming. The traditional farming fosters teamwork in families and the community. By working together, they also reduce their carbon footprint on the planet. This keeps their spirits and optimism high, even through difficult times.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-28   1012 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-28

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 3 of 3

17:23

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 3 of 3

The special arts of traditional Persian miniature painting and calligraphy are deeply rooted in Afghan culture. Persian miniatures is listed in UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The ancient art of calligraphy is deemed sacred in Afghanistan as it is considered a link between the spiritual world and the physical world. Since the 1900s, western art styles have been introduced into Afghanistan and integrated into traditional Afghan artworks. The preferred Afghan fine art forms are mostly realistic oil and watercolor paintings. Afghans have many traditional musical instruments to nurture their body and soul. The national instrument of Afghanistan is the Rubab, which dates back to the 7th Century and is known as “the Lion of Instruments.” The Rubab is often used to accompany Afghan and Persian Sufi poets in their poetry recitals. Like many cultures, Afghan traditional music and dance can be enjoyed at festivals and celebrations such as weddings.Throughout Afghan history many famous writers, poets, scientists, activists, and artists have emerged. The Venerated Enlightened Master Jalāl ad-Dīn Mohammad Rūmī, who is simply known as Rumi, was a world-renowned poet and Islamic scholar in the 13th-century. With his poems translated into countless languages, Rumi is considered one of the most popular poets in the world. Dr. Sima Samar is a famous Afghan women's and human rights advocate, activist, and social worker within national and international platforms. Her contributions have been widely recognized and she has received several prestigious awards. All throughout the year, numerous festivals and celebrations are held in Afghanistan. Nowruz, celebrated between January and March on New Year of the Islamic calendar, is the most popular festival in Afghanistan. Music and dances are performed for celebrations as farmers express gratitude and joy for their crops. Wheat, rice, barley, and cotton are the major agricultural crops of Afghanistan. The traditional food is mostly vegan by default. Beans, lentils, chickpeas, or kidney beans cooked in a thick stew with tomatoes and onions are quite common dishes in Afghanistan.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-27   1000 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-27

Bermuda - A Happy Place to Be

12:09

Bermuda - A Happy Place to Be

In today’s show, we will explore the history, culture, and natural wonders of Bermuda. Located in the North Atlantic off the east coast of North America, Bermuda is the oldest British colony. The water at beaches in Bermuda is always crystal-clear year round, making it a perfect relaxing destination for holiday vacations. Bermuda has a population of about 63,000 people, inheriting colorful cultures from descendants of mainly Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, with a small percentage of Asians. Bermudians have a very distinct fashion sense, and the Bermuda shorts are renowned around the world. The people of Bermuda highly value social etiquette and are known for their good manners. The spirit of kindness and politeness is most exemplified by Mr. Johnny Barnes, a beloved figure in Bermuda. Mr. Barnes was a devout Christian. He credited the Lord Jesus Christ’s teachings on brotherly love as his inspiration. “Life is sweet, life is beautiful. No matter what happens in life, it is always sweet to be alive. Enjoy the sunshine, the flowers, the birds - they're happy.” Bermudians love nature and are avid wildlife conservationists. It is the biodiversity of Bermuda that makes it a truly special place. From old English ceremonies, to art festivals, concerts, and holidays, Bermudians embrace any chance to celebrate. In a culture of festivities, dancing and music is an essential part of everyday life. Bermuda music is a contributing factor to the overall Caribbean music genre. The Gombey dance is a symbol of Bermudan culture. One of the most notable events in Bermuda is the Gombey Festival, a celebration of African-Bermudan culture that usually takes place in September or October. Weekly events known as Harbor Nights are also held in Hamilton to showcase local musicians and performers. Every Wednesday night on Front Street, from May to October, outdoor arts and crafts are displayed. As if a testament to the colorful culture of Bermuda and its happy people, the majority of the artworks are bright water-color paintings inspired by the island’s vibrant hues of life.
Културни следи по света
2020-06-03   991 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-06-03

The Waorani People – Pioneers and Protectors of the Amazon

16:27

The Waorani People – Pioneers and Protectors of the Amazon

Ecuador hosts a portion of the magnificent Amazon rainforest and is also home to the native Waorani people, also known as the Huaorani, Waodani, or the Waos. Like other indigenous tribes across the globe, the Waorani have a symbiotic relationship with the natural environment. The forest is their beloved space, and they rely on nature for sustenance, water, safety, emotional fulfillment, and comfort. Hence, they passionately seek to protect and preserve the forest and its resources for younger generations. Indeed, the forest is full of natural treasures, such as a range of plants that are thought to keep the Waorani people healthy and strong. Phytochemicals are biochemicals that plants make to survive. The plants use these chemicals to defend themselves against dangerous microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and even certain parasites. Human cells have receptors that absorb these protective plant phytochemicals. The Waorani also rely on the forest in the construction of their homes. While Waorani society is reported to be quite egalitarian, with relative equality between men and women, many Waorani women, in particular, are boldly leading the people into the future and raising awareness of the necessity of forest protection.
Културни следи по света
2020-03-18   986 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-03-18

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 2 of 3

14:34

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 2 of 3

Where did the kente cloth originate? A popular legend traces it back to the Ashanti Kingdom’s first ruler, His Majesty Osei Tutu. He invited weavers from across the region to visit the neighboring Ivory Coast to expand their weaving skills. The spider offered to teach the men how to weave the designs in exchange for some favors. The kingdom adopted their creations, and kente became a royal cloth reserved for special occasions. Ghanaians have developed over 300 patterns, each conveying a particular message, reminding people of important virtues and wisdom. For example, a reflecting zig-zag pattern is called “Obi nkye obi kwan mu si” which means, “To err is human.” This design symbolizes forgiveness, conciliation, tolerance, and patience. Various artists and prominent leaders are known to wear kente clothing at public events. Adinkra symbols were pioneered by the Bono people of Gyaman. Gye Nyame, meaning “except for God,” is a symbol expressing the omnipotence of God and reminds everyone to fear nothing except for God. One of the most significant symbols of kente cloths “Sankofa” or “Go back and get it” is a bird with feet facing forward, head turned backwards, and its mouth carrying a precious egg. This icon embodies the proverb “Se wo were fi na wosankofa a yenkyi,” which translates to “It is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.” Although many past traditions and cultures have faded away, the people of Ghana and Africa are encouraged to embrace their roots and regain knowledge of their cultural identity. The Heritage and Cultural Society of Africa (HACSA) uses the Sankofa symbol in their logo. “The Door of Return” is another initiative that seeks to connect Africa with the Diaspora, and advance African economic development. The 70-year-old music icon, Stevie Wonder, is a celebrity that has made plans to relocate permanently to Ghana. In Ghana, music and dance are an essential aspect of life. Throughout the year, there are scheduled festivals and several rites and rituals that are performed to mark the passage of life. These include celebrations for childbirth, puberty, engagement, marriage, and death. Citizens from the north prefer to use string and calabash instruments, while those from the south mostly use drums and gongs. The Ewe people believe that this can become a mind-nurturing exercise that helps balance human thought and emotion in the challenges of life.
Културни следи по света
2021-06-23   977 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-06-23

The Rich Indigenous Culture of the Ryukyuan People

17:47

The Rich Indigenous Culture of the Ryukyuan People

The Ryukyuan people are an East Asian indigenous group native to the Ryukyu archipelago that dots the vast Pacific Ocean. Traditionally, the Ryukyuan people have been strongly influenced by ancient Chinese customs, and contemporary Ryukyuan culture has also integrated rich Japanese cultural elements. The earliest Ryukyuan islanders trace back to about 30,000 years ago. Ryukyu people have their own distinct culture, language and religion, and most parts of their lifestyle are significantly different from Japanese mainlanders. The Ryukyu native religion features ancestor veneration and respect for the relationships between the living, dead, and the gods and spirits of the natural world. The ancient sacred religious sites and royal architecture are an important cultural heritage of the Ryukyu Kingdom which lasted from 1429 until 1879. Ryukyu lacquerware, made from the lacquer tree, is specifically distinguished by the embedded seashells design, rich native Ryukyuan artistic motifs, and a strong red lacquer style; the Ryukyu lacquerware artwork found in a household may include interior furniture, storing cabinets and boxes, and dining ware. The time-honored designs on yachimun are generally simplified auspicious motifs, such as thickly wooded plants meaning vitality or a fish pattern meaning prosperity of posterity. Ryukyu traditional glassware production began in the early Meiji era (1868-1912). Weaving was an important tradition in the old days. Kijoka-bashofu is the art of making traditionally woven cloth and has been practiced since the 13th century in Okinawa. Bingata is a traditional stenciled resist dyeing technique dating from the Ryukyu Kingdom period, and it was believed to be an integration of the dyeing processes from India, China and Java. The artistic Ryukyuan people are rich in their age-old music and dance arts. The well-known martial art of karate was created by ancient Ryukyu people during the Ryukyu Kingdom period. Combining Chinese kung fu and Ryukyu native techniques, karate is now a complete system of self-defense and a popular martial art all over the world. The traditional staple foods of Ryukyuan people on the Okinawa Islands are primarily plant-based, and customarily potato, sweet potato, and taro root have been eaten. Furthermore, Okinawan Ryukyuan people treat food as medicine and utilize many practices from Traditional Chinese Medicine.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-07   975 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-07

The Peaceful Êzîdî People of the Middle East

12:18

The Peaceful Êzîdî People of the Middle East

Religion plays a significant role in the lives of many Êzîdî people. Their religion, Yazidism, is considered to be one of the oldest religions from the fertile area of Mesopotamia. According to some manuscripts, it dates back to the third millennium BC. It is an oral tradition whereby one generation passes on religious knowledge to the next. The overarching Êzîdî belief is in one God who has seven angel representatives. Some stories recount that God created the angels from Hes own light, similar to the way in which one candle flame lights many others. A specific angel, Melek Tawus, which can be spelled in many different ways, is considered to be the chief angel. God is considered to be omnipotent. The following excerpt from the Kitab al-Jilwah, that was published in The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures in April 1909, underscores this point: “I was, am now, and shall have no end. I exercise dominion over all creatures and over the affairs of all who are under the protection of my image. I am ever present to help all who trust in me and call upon me in time of need. There is no place in the universe that knows not my presence.” The Êzîdî make pilgrimages to and worship at sacred sites in the Middle East. One of the most revered sites is that of the Lalish Temple or Lalish Noorani. The temple is located in the Sheikhan district in the Nineveh Governate in northern Iraq. The Iraqi government has submitted an application to UNESCO for it to be added to the list of World Heritage sites. Traditionally, it has been a requirement that each Êzîdî makes a pilgrimage here within their lifetime. The temple is also the burial site of Sheikh Adi Ibn Musafir, who was considered to be an incarnation of Melek Tawus. The architecture of this and other Êzîdî temples is visually beautiful and holds deep meaning. The four corners at the base of temples represent chapters of peace. The conical spires (or quba) are representative of an Êzîdî holy figure. The circular base of the spires represents the Earth that receives the sun’s rays. The columns supporting the seven pillars at Lalish represent each of the seven holy angels.
Културни следи по света
2021-05-05   972 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-05-05

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 1 of 3

16:03

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 1 of 3

Afghanistan is a landlocked country located at the crossroads of Central and South Asia. Afghanistan borders Pakistan to the east and south, China to the northeast, Iran to the west, and Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan to the north. Because of its strategically important location connecting the Middle East, India, and the Eurasian Steppe, Afghanistan served as a central gateway on the ancient Silk Road, the famous trade route stretching from the Mediterranean Sea to China. The earliest human traces in the region of Afghanistan go back at least 52,000 years. The earliest written record can be traced back to around 500 BC - the time of the Achaemenid Empire. Today Afghanistan is an Islamic nation, in which over 90% of the population follow Sunni Islam, about 10% are Shia Muslims, and a small percent follow other religions such as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism. Afghanistan is famous for cherished historical sites including forts, minarets, castles, statues, and palaces, as well as ancient crafts, and a variety of art forms. The Citadel of Herat, located in the center of Herat in the fertile Hari River Valley, is also known as the Citadel of Alexander. Between 1976 and 1979, the historic Citadel was excavated and restored by UNESCO, and after experiencing decades of conflict, several international organizations decided to rebuild it. In the historical trade center of Ghazni city, the Ghazni Minarets, the only architectural remnants of the Bahram Shah Mosque and artifacts of the great Ghaznavid Empire, are two elaborately decorated towers built of fired mud bricks in the middle of the 12th century. The Minaret of Jam, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is located in a remote region of the Ghor Province in western Afghanistan. The Minaret of Jam was built of intricate baked bricks around the year 1190 as a monument of the Ghorid Empire.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-13   963 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-13

The Aloha Culture of Hawaii

14:23

The Aloha Culture of Hawaii

In the United States, Hawaii is the happiest state according to a 2020 survey from Wallethub. In this report, Hawaii received top scores in the “Emotional & Physical Well-Being” and “Community & Environment” categories. In addition, Hawaii state has ranked number one in Gallop’s National Health and Wellbeing Index for seven years in a row. Aunty Pilahi Paki, the beloved Hawaiian poet and philosopher, gave a touching account of aloha in the Aloha Chant: “Make this offering a habit, all persons of Hawaii: Obtain oneness, free of duality, Let thoughts be at ease, Emptiness is your anchor, Be with your breath until complete union.” Aunty Pilahi Paki inspired the Aloha Spirit Law. She foresaw that “the world will turn to Hawaii, as they search for world peace because Hawaii has the key – and that key is aloha!” The Aloha Spirit Law passed in 1986 declares: “Aloha Spirit is the coordination of mind and heart within each person. It brings each person to the self. Each person must think and emote good feelings to others… These are traits of character that express the charm, warmth, and sincerity of Hawaii's people. It was the working philosophy of Native Hawaiians and was presented as a gift to the people of Hawaii.” Within each ohana, members are obliged to take care of each other. Hawaiians constantly ask themselves “What can I do for my ohana?” It is through building these loving connections and caring for each other that Hawaiians find true happiness. Like everybody in the world, Hawaiians also have to deal with life’s trials and tribulations, but their approach in dealing with these can teach us something about being happier. We are all connected to each other in so many ways, so, let’s find those connections, and build our own ohanas with the spirit of aloha and ho’ihi, and we will all be nourished in the universal ocean of love. This might just be the secret ingredient of true happiness.
Културни следи по света
2021-08-18   962 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-08-18

The Resourceful Dorze People of Ethiopia

14:09

The Resourceful Dorze People of Ethiopia

The Dorze live in the Gamo Highlands of Southern Ethiopia and have a population of about 30,000. Living approximately 2,600 meters above sea level, this hospitable community is renowned for its creative members who are skillful cotton weavers and builders. The Dorze are famous for the architectural design and construction of their homes. The residences are 6 – 12 meters high and are made in the shape of an elephant’s head, often with two holes at the top that resemble the pachyderm’s eyes. Leaf sheaths of the enset, or the false banana plant, are used on the structures and can last a remarkable 10 – 20 years! The previously mentioned enset is a highly versatile plant that is much utilized by the Dorze. Although it doesn’t produce bananas, every part of it is still used in various practical ways. For example, the women prepare kocho, a type of flatbread, from the trunk and stem. Bula, a starchy white powder that can be utilized to make dumplings or porridge, also comes from the plant. The fibrous strands of the trunk are employed in the creation of houses, ropes, and a musical instrument known as the krar. The Dorze people show such remarkable resourcefulness and ingenuity by using this plant in such varied means! The Dorze love to sing and dance and have a deep appreciation for music. Their songs use polyphonic multi-part vocals where all members of the community are actively involved in the process of singing, clapping and celebrating. It is also a custom that the whole village sings before, during, and after funeral rites. The Dorze are also highly expressive in their weaving. In fact, their workmanship is admired so much that they have earned the reputation of being the finest cotton weavers in Ethiopia. In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital, the word Dorze is actually used as a synonym for weaving! Indeed, the Dorze people are skilled in many areas of life and are able to express themselves creatively through activities such as building and weaving as well as performing traditional songs and dances.
Културни следи по света
2020-06-12   946 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-06-12

Bribris-indigenous of Costa Rica

14:50

Bribris-indigenous of Costa Rica

The proud Bribri cultural legacy passes from one generation to the next through an oral tradition. This indigenous group has a strong bond with Mother Earth. Their language is called Bribri, which approximately 60% of the residents of the Talamanca Bribri Indigenous Reserve speak. Within the Bribri, people belong to different clans, and membership is based on the clan affiliation of one’s mother. Today, the Bribri remain an agricultural group, and besides corn, raise tubers, cacao, bananas, pejibaye, yucca, rice, and beans. Their belief regarding their origin as a people has agricultural roots. There is a belief among the Bribri that all are equal and that humans are not above the trees or water in the forest in terms of importance. As a result, nature is treated in a reverential manner.
Културни следи по света
2019-12-11   939 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2019-12-11

The Tradition of Respecting the Elderly, Part 1 of 2

15:40

The Tradition of Respecting the Elderly, Part 1 of 2

In this 2-part program, we celebrate the cultural traditions of respecting elders around the world across various religions. In Asian societies, honoring elders is one of the fundamental principles. For example, in the Chinese culture, there is a saying, “among hundreds of moral behaviors, the virtue of being filial comes first” The long tradition of Filial Virtue or Filial Piety is considered the highest virtue in Chinese culture. It is more than just respect, and also includes love, care for, support, and devotion to the elderly. Honoring the elders extends to older siblings, family members, teachers, and citizens of high position in the Chinese culture. This moral principle contributes to establishing a peaceful society. In Âu Lạc, also known as Vietnam, there are usually many generations living together in one household. This allows all the generations to support and care for one another. In almost all the cultures of the Orient, there is a common reverence for elders for their wisdom, lifelong hard work, and all the sacrifices for family.
Културни следи по света
2020-03-04   930 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-03-04
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