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Категория : Културни следи по света
Дата : 2021
Сортирай : Най-популярни
Субтитри : Всичко

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Indian Saraswati Veena

18:00

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Indian Saraswati Veena

The Saraswati veena is one of India’s oldest musical instruments. It is a large fretted lute that is named after the Goddess Saraswati, the Hindu goddess of knowledge and art. Often referred to as the “Queen of Instruments,” it is a predominant solo instrument in the Carnatic music, the main style of classical music in southern India, and distinct from the Hindustani music of the north. Since ancient times, music of the veena was thought to possess the power to purify the mind and uplift people’s consciousness into transcendent spiritual realms. Early depictions of the veena can be found in temples, great Vedic scriptures, and famous Hindu epics. Namely, the two great epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, both had references to it. The Goddess Saraswati is often depicted seated upon a swan playing a veena. Let’s hear a segment from a veena performance of the classic piece “Pibare Rama Rasam,” by Meera Sharma. The veena produces a full, warm tone with slightly buzzing and metallic qualities. Its design is said to be exceptional, because it allows for a complete classical solo recital. The four main strings, which are tuned to D sharp, A sharp, D sharp and A sharp, can produce melodic structures of improvisation over several octaves. The remaining three drone strings help to maintain the pitch and sustain a rhythmic beat. To play the veena, the musician sits cross-legged and holds the instrument slightly away at an angle. The large resonator lies on the floor near the player’s right leg while the small gourd rests on the player’s left thigh. The player’s left arm passes beneath the neck, curves upwards to manipulate the frets, and then presses on the strings to produce tones of different pitches. Also, the musician’s right palm sits at the edge of the top plank, and the index and middle fingers pluck the strings, while the little finger plays the drone strings. Let’s take a moment to enjoy a classical Indian and Western fusion cover of “The Classic Fuze,” arranged by Shrimati T Veena Gayatri Raj.
Културни следи по света
2021-01-13   1871 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-01-13

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Hungarian Cimbalom

17:28

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Hungarian Cimbalom

The cimbalom, an elaborate stringed instrument found mainly in the Central and Eastern European nations, belongs to the dulcimer family and is played by striking metal strings mounted over a trapezoidal soundboard. Associated with the music of the Hungarian Gypsies, the cimbalom is a symbol of Hungary as well as its national instrument. Cimbaloms come in varying sizes, tone groupings, and string arrangements. A modern cimbalom consists of 125 steel and copper strings that are stretched across a trapezoidal wooden box. The treble strings are made entirely of steel while the bass strings are over-spun with copper. Performers typically play the instrument by striking the strings with two mallets whose ends may be left bare or covered with a fabric such as cotton to create various tone qualities. The emergence of the cimbalom in classical music helped to popularize the instrument outside of Eastern Europe. Besides folk, classical, and film compositions, the cimbalom also plays a role in rock music. A key figure in the history of the cimbalom is Aladár Rácz, a great cimbalom player known for creating cimbalom adaptations of Baroque harpsichord pieces. Rácz began learning the instrument at the age of three and performed with Hungarian folk music ensembles throughout Budapest. Today, one of the foremost Hungarian cimbalom players is Kálmán Balogh, a graduate of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music who has completed many successful tours with various ensembles around the world. His music connects ancient folk traditions with elements of jazz to bring a dynamic and unique experience to audiences. Now, to conclude let’s listen to an excerpt from a piece of traditional folk music performed by Kálmán Balogh.
Културни следи по света
2021-01-06   1834 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-01-06

The Charming Culture of Belize, Part 1 of 2

15:44

The Charming Culture of Belize, Part 1 of 2

Belize is located on the northeastern coast of Central America. Belmopan is the capital city, while the largest city is Belize City. In addition to the official language of English, over ten distinct languages are spoken in this highly multicultural society, including Belizean Creole (Kriol) and Spanish. As the smallest country in Central America, Belize currently has a population of around 406,000. The nation’s ancient Mayan culture, combined with its peaceful and pluralistic society, make the country a uniquely spiritual and harmonious land. Belizean people are very friendly to each other, and courtesy is of utmost importance in this traditional society. Acquaintances will often stop to spend several minutes chatting when they meet each other unexpectedly, and it is very common for Belizeans to greet each other on the street even when they do not know each other. With its cultural dynamics and rich heritages, the people of Belize enjoy a wide variety of sports and recreational activities. The multiethnic society of Belize is also reflected in the nation’s music, which is influenced by a unique mix of Creole, Mestizo, Garìfuna, Mayan and European styles. The music of the indigenous Mestizo and Mayan people is characterized by the Marimba, a xylophone-like percussion instrument which derives from an African instrument called a lamellaphone. The brilliant Maya civilization has left many cherished heritage sites in Belize, including 10 Mayan Pyramids, which reflect the sophisticated knowledge the ancient Maya people had of the cosmos, such as the relative movement of the Earth and the stars. The Maya people have played a key role in preserving the rainforests of Belize. In 2015 the Maya Leaders Alliance of southern Belize achieved a milestone legal victory in preserving their tenure of their historical homeland; this was the first indigenous people’s land rights victory in a Caribbean country. The Maya Leaders Alliance also actively promotes sustainable forest management and environmental conservation and campaigns to improve services in education, health, and infrastructure for 39 Mayan villages. It was awarded the Prestigious Equator Prize of 2015 for its noble efforts in protecting its indigenous people and precious rainforests.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-14   1688 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-14

The Arctic’s Resilient Inuit People

11:48

The Arctic’s Resilient Inuit People

The Inuit are a remarkable indigenous community who are considered the world’s northernmost culture. Living above the tree line in the Arctic, this nomadic group needed to develop special skills to survive. One of the most famous and iconic structures made by the Inuit is the igloo, which they developed as a temporary shelter for the long, harsh winters. An igloo is typically made of very hard packed snow and excellent at blocking out wind. Once people are inside the structure, their body heat warms the interior, causing a small amount of melting. If they then leave the igloo for a period, the inside walls freeze up again. The ice created serves as a barrier to the colder temperatures outside. Another iconic feature of the ancient Inuit was their mode of transportation. During the warmer months, when travel on ice and snow was not practical, they walked on foot and used boats. They had two types of boats, the umiak and the kayak. The umiak was the larger one and used for transporting people and trading goods. Umiaks could carry up to 15 people, but were also light enough to lift out of the water and transport across the ice. Kayak building and use is a notable aspect of Inuit culture. One of the unique features of an Inuit kayak is that the watertight, covered deck protects the navigator from the elements, water spray and waves. A great deal about the Inuit can be understood by their approach to music. Katajjaq, or throat singing, is a vocal game or contest usually involving one or more pairs of women. Pisiit songs are sacred, typically accompanied by a drum, and are of joy, healing, and resilience. They record Inuit history and are poetry-like. The modern Inuit come from a lineage of people dating back thousands of years who have had to survive in harsh conditions. But the specter of climate change is one that is threatening their unique and vibrant way of life. We pray that there will soon be a rapid and full embrace of the plant-based diet globally as this will halt the Arctic’s melting and help safeguard the Inuit culture.
Културни следи по света
2021-01-20   1452 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-01-20

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 1 of 3

14:56

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 1 of 3

Ghana is located along the Guinea Gulf and Atlantic Ocean in West Africa. Spanning over 560 kilometers of tropical coastline, Ghana is a place of natural beauty and colorful cultures. The country’s cultural mosaic encompasses over 70 different tribes and six major ethnic groups. Although English is the most common language, Ghanaians also widely speak in native tongues, such as Twi and Ga. There are as many as 52 languages and hundreds of dialects spoken in this African country. Ghanaians embrace a collective culture where everything is shared, including food and social reputation. Ghana is one of the 32 African countries where baobab trees flourish. Many Savannah communities build their homes near these trees because they provide humans and animals with shelter, food, and water. The baobab fruit is also one of the world’s most nutrient-dense and antioxidant-rich fruits. Ghana is infused with a vibrant culture of art, music, and dance. The Ashanti Region in south Ghana is known to be the largest center for traditional crafts. Bonwire is famous for being the first Ashanti weaving village that was responsible for creating Kente cloth for the king. Kente is one of Ghana’s national textiles. The art of wood carving can be found in the Ahwiaa village. Akua’Ba figures are used by Akan women as a symbol of fertility. The Ashanti community believes that the stool is the receptacle of the soul, and the chiefs’ stools are specially preserved in shrines. Teshie and Nungua are two neighboring villages that feature fantasy coffin workshops. For example, the coffin can be made in the form of a car, airplane, shoe, sewing machine, building, or animal. Traditionally, Ghanaian women begin to wear waist beads when they enter adult age. In the east, the Krobo people hold a Dipo ceremony in April to celebrate girls’ transition from youth to adulthood. Women in the Sirigu village play an important role in the art of mural painting. The murals are a unique expression of the cultural identity of the ethnic Kassena-Nankana people. For the animal symbols, the cow represents wealth, the python is a holy icon that embodies protection, the two-headed crocodile symbolizes unity, and the chicken indicates hospitality.
Културни следи по света
2021-06-16   1448 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-06-16

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Finnish Kantele

14:37

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Finnish Kantele

The kantele, a plucked string instrument belonging to the zither family, is the Finnish version of the psaltery played by peoples living in the eastern Baltic countries. Kanteles are grouped into two categories: the small kantele and the concert kantele. Small kanteles have 15 or fewer strings with a range of around two octaves and generally have a shape similar to that of traditional instruments. The main playing techniques are plucking and strumming the strings with the fingers or with a stick. Although various playing methods exist, the most traditional way is to use the right thumb to play the shortest string and one finger for each of the other strings while interleaving the fingers of the left and right hands. A reverberant sound is produced by plucking a string upward so that all the other strings are free to vibrate. With a kantele, you can make various kinds of tones to play melodic lines, an accompaniment, or even both! Modern concert kanteles can have up to 40 strings with a switch mechanism for making sharps and flats, an innovation made by Paul Salminen in the 1920s. The shape of these instruments is similar to that of large western stringed instruments such as the piano or harp. For playing a concert kantele, a table is used and the strings are pulled toward the player. The main playing technique is to pluck the strings or glide from one string to another using the index, middle, and ring fingers. The thumb plucks up and then moves underneath the palm. This wonderful instrument can be used for playing in various musical forms and genres, from folk tunes, waltzes, serious art music, and soothing meditative melodies to pop, rock, and avant-garde music. With its bell-like tones, the kantele is able to create a mystical mood that transports listeners back to legendary or mythical realms. Let’s now enjoy an excerpt from “Motion” performed in 2020 by the duo Eva Alkula and Tomoya Nakai on top of a scenic mountain.
Културни следи по света
2021-03-17   1374 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-03-17

Latin American Dance

14:06

Latin American Dance

Latin America is a place with many culturally enriched dances. Stemming from Mexico, South America, Central America and the Caribbean, Latin American dances infuse cultural flavour with technical skill to bring exciting performances to audiences worldwide. Modern Latin American dance consists of a wide variety of styles that were formed in separate cities and countries. Some of the dances have been standardised with internationally agreed techniques, rhythms and tempos. The dances generally fall into two categories - the International and American Style. The International Latin Style dances are often performed competitively due to its highly disciplined and technical traits. The dance styles in this category include the Cha Cha, Rumba, Samba, Paso Doble and Jive. The Cha Cha, originally known as Cha Cha Cha, is one of the staples of international Latin dance competitions. The dance is characterized by three quick steps forward and two slower steps backwards - “one, two, cha-cha-cha, three, four, cha-cha-cha.” While maintaining minimal upper-torso movement, dancers sway their hips and straighten their knees on half beats. The slowest of the Latin dances is the Rumba. Considered to be the most romantic of the Latin dances, the Rumba emphasizes movement of the body rather than the feet and is full of emotion and interaction between partners. Each dancer tries to entice the other with side-to-side hip movements and twisted steps. Danced to a basic pattern of two quick side steps and a slow forward step, the Rumba is adaptable to many musical forms that accommodate a quick-quick-slow rhythm. In Brazil, Samba is a popular Latin dance at street festivals and celebrations like the Brazilian Carnival. Set to music with African rhythms, this joyful and lively dance is characterized by rapidly moving hips and quick transfers of weight. Although it is usually performed solo in the Brazilian culture, ballroom versions have been developed where partners dance with bounce and hip rolling motions. The fastest of the Latin dances is the Jive. This happy and extremely energetic dance incorporates plenty of knee-lifting, bending, kicking, flicking and rocking of the hips. Latin American dances are taught in academies all around the world. Through dancing, people of different ages and backgrounds can stay physically fit while building new friendships. Consistent dance practice brings numerous health and social benefits.
Културни следи по света
2021-01-08   1332 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-01-08

The Native Esselen People of North America

16:39

The Native Esselen People of North America

“Inside a cave in a narrow canyon near Tassajara The vault of rock is painted with hands, A multitude of hands in the twilight, a cloud of men’s palms, no more, No other picture. There’s no one to say Whether the brown shy quiet people who are dead intended Religion or magic, or made their tracings In the idleness of art; but over the division of years these careful Signs-manual are now like a sealed message…” The poem “Hands” we just listened to is about the palm imprints found in the caves of Tassajara, which is situated deep in a mountain valley in the secluded Ventana Wilderness of California, the original home of the native Esselen people. The imprints of the palms were made by these people more than 3,000 years ago, and are likely to have either religious or magical significance, as the curious US poet Robinson Jeffers wondered. Jeffers’ succinct messages assert that modern-day humans should not despise these palm imprints by the Esselen as they were also human, and that people should be one with nature and enjoy the pristine beauty of the Tassajara without damaging it. One should not look down on one’s primitive ancestors as being barbaric and uncivilized, but instead bear in mind their relentless struggles for civilization and continued betterment of one generation after another. Civilization and progress are purely relative. So, who exactly are the Esselen people? They are an Indigenous American group whose language is part of the Hokan language family and are native to the Santa Lucia Mountains south of the Big Sur River in Big Sur, Monterey County, California. They used to live both on the coast and inland depending on the season. Men wore little clothing or were bare most of the time, while females may have worn a small apron, and in cold weather they may have applied mud to their bodies to keep warm. Throughout most of the year, the Esselen girls would gather acorns and other items from the forests to make into food. Their staple foods consisted of seeds of many varieties. The Esselen traded acorns, salt, baskets, beads, and other commodities with local tribes. The Esselen are a small tribe with customs similar to those of other California Native American tribes; however, they have different beliefs. To the Esselen people, many things such as the stars, trees, rocks, and minerals have power and are alive. They believe that rocks have memory and honor them by leaving their handprints on rocks.
Културни следи по света
2021-08-25   1323 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-08-25

Onsens - The Hotsprings of Japan

12:35

Onsens - The Hotsprings of Japan

Japan, the “Land of the Rising Sun,” is an island country in East Asia. Although it is a nation with rapid modern development, it has never lost touch with its traditional culture and heritage. The island is blessed with more than 3,000 mineral-rich onsens, fed directly from the 25,000 thermal springs bubbling beneath its unique geothermal archipelago. Furthermore, the ongoing volcanic activities provides continuous fuel for its numerous hot springs. These natural onsens, which are scenically beautiful and wonderfully warm enough for bathing, are also rich in minerals that are beneficial to the human body. For over a thousand years, hot springs have become an essential part of the Japanese way of living; namely, they provide a sanctuary for personal reflection, relaxation and healing. Have you ever wondered how the healing benefit of hot springs was discovered? According to “Nihon Shoki” (“The Chronicles of Japan”), the 1,300-year-old annal of Japanese history and legend, a white heron was healed after dipping its injured leg into hot water gushing out of the rocks. Ever since then, people started bathing in the naturally heated spring water onsens for healing and relaxation. “Bathing just once in this hot spring will clear your skin, and continued bathing will cure all of your aches and pains... people call it – the water of the gods.” This is a saying about Tamatsukuri Onsen written in 733 AD, as recorded in the “Izumo no Kuni Fudoki” (“Chronicle of the Land of Izumo”). This saying provides another insight into the importance of onsens and their value in the hearts of the Japanese people. This “water of the gods” in the myriad of Japanese onsens has for centuries soothed, healed and nurtured all who partook in its pleasures. The spirit of generosity and hospitality of the Japanese people is perhaps best summarized by the motto of Hananoyu Inn, as featured in the animation movie “Okko’s Inn”: “Hananoyu Spring rejects no one. It welcomes and heals everyone!” We thank Japan for sharing this abundant blessing from Mother Nature with the world.
Културни следи по света
2021-02-03   1300 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-02-03

Croatia: A Crossroads of Precious Cultures, Part 1 of 3

15:04

Croatia: A Crossroads of Precious Cultures, Part 1 of 3

The Republic of Croatia is a beautiful European country located at the crossroads connecting Central Europe and the Mediterranean Sea. The nation borders Slovenia, Hungary, and several other countries. Croatia features beautiful islands, silver beaches, and blue sea off of its coast. Its mainland has a number of mountain ranges, with Dinara Mountain being the highest peak. Due to its geographic location, Croatia enjoys a moderately warm climate, so the country is suitable for both peaceful living and comfortable travel. Its history, cultural heritage, and natural beauty make Croatia one of the most visited of all Mediterranean destinations. In addition to being popular with visitors, Croatia also takes proactive action to preserve its history, natural resources, and environment by promoting sustainable travel and eco-friendly accommodations. The country is also home to several minority ethnic groups such as the Serbs, the Bosniaks, the Hungarians, the Slovenians, the Czechs, and the Romani people. Although more than 86% of the population is Roman Catholic, freedom of religion is a right that is fully protected by the Croatian constitution.Croatia is an important artistic and architectural center in southeastern Europe. We’ll now present some examples that showcase the architectural splendor of this beautiful land. Most of these historical places have been recognized as World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. Diocletian’s Palace, one of the world’s best-preserved examples of Roman architecture, is a massive structure built between 295 AD and 305 AD by the Roman emperor Diocletian. The Cathedral of Saint Domnius in Split city was built between 295 AD and 305 AD, and stands as the oldest of European cathedrals. It is also the world’s oldest Catholic cathedral remaining in use in its original form. The Euphrasian Basilica is one of the best preserved early Christian complexes and is considered one of the world’s most significant historical monuments. The most unique and largest treasures of the Euphrasian Basilica are the magnificent mosaics on the apse. Its central part is decorated with scenes of the Mother of God enthroned with Christ and surrounded by archangels.
Културни следи по света
2021-05-26   1220 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-05-26

The Culture of Laos

12:08

The Culture of Laos

Located in the heart of the Indochinese Peninsula, Lao People's Democratic Republic is famous for its beautiful culture, unique traditions, and pristine landscape. The only landlocked country in Southeast Asia, Laos is bordered by Myanmar, China, Âu Lạc or Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand. About 66% of the population are Theravada Buddhists while the rest belong to at least 48 distinct ethnic minority groups. The capital city Vientiane is not only the largest city, but also a cultural commercial center containing many significant national monuments like the Pha That Luang which is Lao’s largest icon of Buddhism. Residential buildings in Laos are built on stilts, which show off the wisdom of the ancestors who lived comfortably, despite the hot and humid climate. Often living along rivers and streams, Lao houses are usually built using sustainable materials including strong, resilient wood. The traditional culture and arts in Laos have a very long history. Wood carving and metal artworks are used for sculpting Buddha statues or decorating the doors and windows of Buddhist temples. Each Lao ethnic group has their own unique craft style and tradition, which are well expressed through their distinctive traditional textiles and clothing. Khaen is a distinctive Laotian folk music instrument, which comprises a double row of bamboo-like reeds and a hardwood sound box. In 2017, the Khaen music of Laos was inscribed as the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. Lam Lao is a typical Lao folk music form, where a singer or story-teller is accompanied by a Khaen performance. Lao folk arts are strongly influenced by Theravada Buddhist culture such as the Hindu epics, and these religious influences are well preserved in the national literature, “Ramayana.” Folk dances are usually accompanied by folk music “lam.” The most popular kind of folk dance or Lao national dance is “lam vong,” which is a slow and graceful couples-dance often performed at weddings, celebrations, and local social events. Lao culture embraces many celebrations on Buddhist holidays, political holidays and ethnic festivals.
Културни следи по света
2021-03-31   1217 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-03-31

Japanese Traditional Crafts, Part 1 of 2 - Kintsugi: Finding Beauty in Mending Pottery

14:22

Japanese Traditional Crafts, Part 1 of 2 - Kintsugi: Finding Beauty in Mending Pottery

Japan has a long history of ceramics, dating back to the Jōmon period (c. 14,000 – 300 BC), when pottery became widespread in the country, including for decorative purposes. Japanese potters have used lacquer in their work since around 2,400 BC. Traditional Japanese lacquer is commonly called urushi lacquer because it’s made from the sap of the urushi tree. In Kintsugi, lacquer is used to repair broken pottery, but then instead of hiding the cracks or repairs, a sprinkling of gold, silver or platinum is added to enhance it. If gold is used, the process is called “kintsugi,” where “kin” means “gold” and “tsugi” means “joinery.” With a delicate touch of kintsugi and a little bit of TLC, broken items gain a new life and dignity, symbolizing the beauty of healing and rebirth. The Zen Buddhist aesthetic behind Kintsugi is connected with the Japanese ideal of mushin a state of mind free from anger, fear, and ego. A person who has achieved a state of mushin accepts and embraces change and fate as aspects of human existence, so he or she recognizes, and even celebrates the beauty in broken, imperfect things. Mr. Hidetoshi Nobu is a second-generation kintsugi master from Takeo town in Saga Prefecture in Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s main islands. Mr. Nobu is so skilled at kintsugi that he frequently restores historical artwork for museums and art dealers. He has seen a rise in the number of requests from private individuals over the past few decades. Mr. Nobu also teaches kintsugi workshops around Japan. Another famous kintsugi enthusiast and teacher is Mr. Kunio Nakamura, the owner of the Sixth Dimension bookstore cafe in Ogikubo, Tokyo, where he hosts kintsugi classes. As a freelance director of art and travel shows, Mr. Nakamura has visited over 40 countries, and has written many books on the art of Kintsugi. Kintsugi is increasingly being recognized as a method of quieting and healing the mind. By tending to the cracks and broken pieces and creating something beautiful from them, one learns to appreciate life’s flaws and imperfections, and that opportunities for healing, growth, and transformation are always present.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-24   1217 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-24

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 3 of 3

14:11

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 3 of 3

In this final episode, we will examine Ghana’s music, dance, and poetry. The traditional chiefs of the Akan people in southern Ghana have a special dance-drumming performance called “kete.” This ensemble is managed by the customary leaders and typically played at the funeral rites for Akan chiefs and in the inauguration of a new chief. Adowa dance is the most frequently performed social dance in the Akan region. Similar to kete, the dance was historically performed for funeral purposes. In modern times, it is often a part of various events, including traditional ceremonies for puberty, marriage, child naming, and traditional festivals. The youth of Ashanti enjoy participating in a recreational dance known as Sikyi. Sikyi is seen primarily at social gatherings where youth express themselves in courtship. The dance is characterized by movements of strutting and bobbing with theatrical elegance. For Ghanaian dance artists, every gesture and body movement contains a unique meaning. Dance in the Ghanaian society is more than an art form; it is the rhythmic heartbeat of the culture itself. The choreography is carefully composed to reflect cultural values, both personally and in the community. Dances also rejuvenate a sense of togetherness among the people of Ghana and allow citizens to convey their feelings on important social issues. Dr. Ephraim Amu is considered to be the father of Ghana’s art-music tradition. In the 1920s, he composed many hymns and patriotic songs in Ewe and Akan. His song, “Yen Ara Asaase Ni” (This is Our Own Land) has become Ghana’s second national anthem. Dr. Amu also stressed the importance of love and warned that gains in the eternal game of life are really of the least importance. Dr. Amu became the first contemporary musician to ever appear on a Ghanaian currency note. Nowadays, many Ghanaian musicians perform Highlife music. Characterized by jazzy horns and multiple guitars, Highlife combines the melodic and main rhythmic structures of traditional Akan music with Western instruments. Ghanaians developed this art form as an expression of their free spirit and human existence.
Културни следи по света
2021-06-30   1170 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-06-30

Holy Songs - Bahá'í Prayers

16:08

Holy Songs - Bahá'í Prayers

The Baháʼí faith is one of the fastest growing religions in the world. Founded in the 19th century by His Holiness Baháʼu'lláh in Persia, it is now estimated to have over five million believers all over the world. Bahá means “glory” or “splendor.” There are three central teachings of the Bahá’i Faith, which are the unity of God, the unity of religion, and unity of humankind. Prayers are important to Baháʼí practitioners, as they bring one closer to God.His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son of His Holiness Baháʼu'lláh and the appointed successor, wrote many beautiful and profound prayer verses. Some of these verses have been set to music by the believers. Today we invite you to listen to three uplifting devotional songs by Baha’i inspired performers with lyrics based on prayers by His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá. The first song is called “Waves of the Sea” from the album “Seed” composed by the British composer Richard Leigh. “Waves of the Sea” is a prayer for oneness. Indeed, each of us is a part of the whole; we are connected, united and are one in essence. If more people realize this, there will be more peace, cooperation, and harmony among us all. The next song is called “Aid Thou,” composed and sung by Rebecca Johnston-Garvin from the album "Befriend Me." The lyrics are based on the prayer “On my God, aid Thou Thy servant,” written by His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá. This prayer reminds us that we all rely on the Almighty God to aid and guide us on our spiritual path, to overcome worldly obstacles and to continue to serve Hirm. The last song “Ray of Light” from the album “Temple of Light” is composed and performed by Christopher Faizi. The video shows various Bahá'í Houses of Worship around the world. These uplifting songs inspired by prayers of His Holiness `Abdu'l-Bahá have certainly brought rays of sunlight into our hearts, encouraging us to strive to be connected with the Divine within.
Културни следи по света
2021-01-27   1107 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-01-27

Kashmir: A Paradise on Earth

14:12

Kashmir: A Paradise on Earth

The fourth Mughal Emperor, His Majesty Jahangir, had said this about Kashmir, “If there’s a paradise on Earth, it is this, it is this, it is this.” Kashmir is widely known for its natural beauty and rich culture. Inhabitants of diverse religious backgrounds including Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Christianity coexist amicably and form their own distinct and harmonious community. This melting pot of cultures is based on the centuries-old indigenous tradition, Kashmiriyat, which values tolerance, peace, and cultural harmony. Kashmir is a land of many legends and famous residents. From Emperors, such as Alexander the Great and Ashoka, to scholars, such as Adi Sankaracharya and the mystic Abhinavagupta, Kashmir is indeed home to some incredible individuals. Kashmir’s ancient monuments tell fascinating stories about the region’s history. In the 8th century CE, the Martand Sun Temple shrine was built in honor of the deity, Surya. This monument is one of the largest temples ever built in Kashmir. It has a colonnaded courtyard and a primary shrine in its center that is surrounded by 84 smaller shrines. Nature’s artistic work in Kashmir can best be appreciated in spring, when almond trees blossom together with multi-colored tulips. Kashmir’s alpine meadows also feature an extensive variety of wildflowers. The Himalayan region is referred to as a beauty spot for medicinal and herbaceous flora. The Kashmiri people have splendid and attractive costumes. A Khan dress or Pathani suit with a skull cap is common attire for men. As for women, the Pheran (a loose, knee-length type of cloak) and Shalwar (pants) with the traditional Kasaba (headgear) comprise their popular outfit. With their diverse history and cultural heritage, the Kashmiri people have forged a unique sense of identity that can be explored through their festivals, dances, music, literature, handicrafts, and cuisine.
Културни следи по света
2021-03-24   1041 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-03-24

The Brokpa People - Vegans for Thousands of Years

11:21

The Brokpa People - Vegans for Thousands of Years

The Brokpa are a unique indigenous community mostly living in the Ladakh area of India. They are also known as the Brogpa or Drogpa. They refer to themselves as Minaro, which means “Aryan.” The term Aryan in the ancient Indian language of Sanskrit translates as “distinguished” or “noble” and historically refers to a light-skinned people who spoke an Indo-European language. They entered ancient India and influenced the culture, literature and religion of the locals.One school of thought on their origin posits that the Brokpa people may be descendants of troops that were left behind by Alexander the Great. It has been noted that the Brokpa folk songs describe their migration route that ties in with this theory, and Alexander the Great is believed to have left his troops in Dardistan or modern-day Pakistan. For somewhere between 2,000 and 5,000 years, the Brokpa maintained a strict vegan diet, meaning they excluded animal products including meat, eggs, and dairy. This age-old way of eating is tied to their traditional spiritual beliefs that the world is divided into three different spheres, including a realm of gods, a realm of people and a lower realm consisting of water spirits. The Brokpa belief is that these worlds are connected by a tree that makes communication between them possible. In order to link with the realm of the gods, there is an emphasis on purity. Brokpa women are respected and honored. This is because women have the power of producing life and carrying on the bloodline of the community. As a result of this, they enjoy freedom and mutual respect within their families and villages. During the Bono-na festival, the women dress up in their finest clothing and walk around slowly in a circle performing a courtship dance, at the same time singing folk songs, and calling out to the men to join them. The women also propose marriage. A distinguishing feature of the Brokpa is their love of flowers. The colorful headgear called “tepi” has numerous decorations attached and is adorned with vibrant flowers. Wearing tepi is considered a way to repel evil influences. The women also wear gold, silver, and other metal jewelry, which are not only decorative but also are believed to have protective qualities. The community members also rely on herbal medicine in order to cure their sick.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-21   1016 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-21

Discovering the Community Spirit of the Dani People

12:15

Discovering the Community Spirit of the Dani People

The resourceful Dani people live in the Baliem Valley, located in the Western New Guinea Highlands of Indonesia. Due to the remoteness of this location, the Dani were largely unknown to the rest of the world until 1938. For this community, spirituality is integral to daily life. The Dani believe that we have a soul inside of us, which they call “edai-egen.” Traditionally, the Dani are animistic in their beliefs and believe in water spirits and particular local gods. They also hold ceremonies to honor the spirits of their ancestors, with particular respect given to the paternal lineage. There is a concept called Atou which involves the male descendants inheriting the magic powers of their ancestors related to protecting the garden, preventing and curing disease, and soil fertilization. When it comes to tending the garden, females play a large role in the production of the sweet potato, which is a staple food in the Dani’s diet. Introduced to this area of the world in the 14th century, there is a surprisingly large number of sweet potato varieties that are cultivated. In Dani life, the family unit is close-knit and consists of an extended family. Two or three families usually live together in housing that is surrounded by a fence. The traditional round house is called a honai, and is made with wooden walls, and a grass roof. The shape is a symbolic reminder of maintaining peace among the community members, and the building plans for each house are always checked and considered by the chieftain before being built. In these unique buildings, air vents are strategically placed in the straw roof and wooden walls provide ventilation. Typically, the buildings have no windows in order for occupants to stay warm, and during cold weather, fires are lit to maximize the heat. In Dani society, the role of leadership of the group is held by the chief, or “Ap Kain” who leads the community. The next tier of leadership involves 3 other chiefs referred to as the Ap. Menteg, Ap. Horeg, and Ap Ubaik Silimo. These chiefs own land and fields. The chiefs are male and considered to be strong, honorable and clever.
Културни следи по света
2021-04-07   1013 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-04-07

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 1 of 2

14:46

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 1 of 2

Venezuela is an immigrant based country, consisting of four main ethnic groups: Around 52% of its population are from the Mestizo, a group with a mix of European, Amerindian, and African ancestries; 42 % are of a European descent; 4% are of an African descent; and 2% population are native Venezuelans. The earliest settlers of ancient Venezuela are generally believed to be Siberians who crossed the Bering Strait, connecting Russia and Alaska, during the last glacial period about 23,000 years ago. Though separated into different groups today, DNA research by Harvard Medical School revealed a common ancestry. Their ancestors moved into North America, and then later to Central and South America. Evidence shows that the earliest habitants of northwest Venezuela traces back more than 15,000 years ago. The agriculture system of indigenous Venezuelan was established as early as the 1st millennium. By the end of the 15th century, an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 indigenous people inhabited the current Venezuela region. Today there are 51 indigenous groups currently living in Venezuela, and 44 groups are officially recognized by the government. The largest groups include the Wayuú, Pemón, Warao, Yanomami, and Kariña peoples. The picturesque Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is home to the Pemón tribes. The Pemón's houses are huts with walls made of clay or bark, and roofs made of palm leaves. Besides collecting the food from the wilderness, Pemón men prepare the soil for planting and the women garden, harvest, and transport crops.Pemón's living area, the Gran Sabana, with its gorgeous sceneries, has become a tourist attraction place and provides the main source of income for the locals. For the last three years, while the economy and tourism have been slow, the Pemón people in the Kavanayén village have resisted lucrative offers from the mining industry, and have returned to a more environmentally responsible way of living, with traditional farming. The traditional farming fosters teamwork in families and the community. By working together, they also reduce their carbon footprint on the planet. This keeps their spirits and optimism high, even through difficult times.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-28   1009 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-28

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 3 of 3

17:23

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 3 of 3

The special arts of traditional Persian miniature painting and calligraphy are deeply rooted in Afghan culture. Persian miniatures is listed in UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The ancient art of calligraphy is deemed sacred in Afghanistan as it is considered a link between the spiritual world and the physical world. Since the 1900s, western art styles have been introduced into Afghanistan and integrated into traditional Afghan artworks. The preferred Afghan fine art forms are mostly realistic oil and watercolor paintings. Afghans have many traditional musical instruments to nurture their body and soul. The national instrument of Afghanistan is the Rubab, which dates back to the 7th Century and is known as “the Lion of Instruments.” The Rubab is often used to accompany Afghan and Persian Sufi poets in their poetry recitals. Like many cultures, Afghan traditional music and dance can be enjoyed at festivals and celebrations such as weddings.Throughout Afghan history many famous writers, poets, scientists, activists, and artists have emerged. The Venerated Enlightened Master Jalāl ad-Dīn Mohammad Rūmī, who is simply known as Rumi, was a world-renowned poet and Islamic scholar in the 13th-century. With his poems translated into countless languages, Rumi is considered one of the most popular poets in the world. Dr. Sima Samar is a famous Afghan women's and human rights advocate, activist, and social worker within national and international platforms. Her contributions have been widely recognized and she has received several prestigious awards. All throughout the year, numerous festivals and celebrations are held in Afghanistan. Nowruz, celebrated between January and March on New Year of the Islamic calendar, is the most popular festival in Afghanistan. Music and dances are performed for celebrations as farmers express gratitude and joy for their crops. Wheat, rice, barley, and cotton are the major agricultural crops of Afghanistan. The traditional food is mostly vegan by default. Beans, lentils, chickpeas, or kidney beans cooked in a thick stew with tomatoes and onions are quite common dishes in Afghanistan.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-27   997 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-27

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 2 of 3

14:34

Ghana – The Blessed Land with a Vibrant Culture, Part 2 of 3

Where did the kente cloth originate? A popular legend traces it back to the Ashanti Kingdom’s first ruler, His Majesty Osei Tutu. He invited weavers from across the region to visit the neighboring Ivory Coast to expand their weaving skills. The spider offered to teach the men how to weave the designs in exchange for some favors. The kingdom adopted their creations, and kente became a royal cloth reserved for special occasions. Ghanaians have developed over 300 patterns, each conveying a particular message, reminding people of important virtues and wisdom. For example, a reflecting zig-zag pattern is called “Obi nkye obi kwan mu si” which means, “To err is human.” This design symbolizes forgiveness, conciliation, tolerance, and patience. Various artists and prominent leaders are known to wear kente clothing at public events. Adinkra symbols were pioneered by the Bono people of Gyaman. Gye Nyame, meaning “except for God,” is a symbol expressing the omnipotence of God and reminds everyone to fear nothing except for God. One of the most significant symbols of kente cloths “Sankofa” or “Go back and get it” is a bird with feet facing forward, head turned backwards, and its mouth carrying a precious egg. This icon embodies the proverb “Se wo were fi na wosankofa a yenkyi,” which translates to “It is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.” Although many past traditions and cultures have faded away, the people of Ghana and Africa are encouraged to embrace their roots and regain knowledge of their cultural identity. The Heritage and Cultural Society of Africa (HACSA) uses the Sankofa symbol in their logo. “The Door of Return” is another initiative that seeks to connect Africa with the Diaspora, and advance African economic development. The 70-year-old music icon, Stevie Wonder, is a celebrity that has made plans to relocate permanently to Ghana. In Ghana, music and dance are an essential aspect of life. Throughout the year, there are scheduled festivals and several rites and rituals that are performed to mark the passage of life. These include celebrations for childbirth, puberty, engagement, marriage, and death. Citizens from the north prefer to use string and calabash instruments, while those from the south mostly use drums and gongs. The Ewe people believe that this can become a mind-nurturing exercise that helps balance human thought and emotion in the challenges of life.
Културни следи по света
2021-06-23   977 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-06-23
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