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Категория : Културни следи по света
Дата : 2021
Сортирай : Най-последни
Субтитри : Всичко

Bhutan: The Land of Happiness

15:59

Bhutan: The Land of Happiness

Bhutan is the only nation in the world to focus on Gross National Happiness or GNH in its national decision-making. Bhutan’s ancient legal code states that: “If the government cannot create happiness for its people, then there is no purpose for the government to exist.” That message from the nation’s ancestors offers a guiding principle to all of Bhutan’s rulers, requiring them to ensure the happiness of all its citizens.The Bhutanese people live according to Buddhist principles of compassion and nonviolence. Since ancient times, they have strived to live in harmony with their environment and to protect both animal-people and plants as best they can. The government combines conservation and carefully implemented ecotourism to earn state revenue. The country has ten national parks that lie on the border with India. In Bhutan’s constitution, Article 5 Section 3 states that at least sixty percent of its territory must be covered by forest. Bhutan has exceeded that objective for several years, as currently, about 72 percent of the kingdom’s land area is forested.As a part of its mission to raise the level of happiness of its citizens, the Bhutanese government has launched an intensive organic farming program. A pilot program began in 2003, and then the National Framework for Organic Farming for Bhutan (NFOFB) was established in 2007, followed by the launch of the National Organic Program (NOP) in 2008. Farmers in the country are becoming increasingly convinced that working in harmony with nature helps to sustain the flow of nature's bounties.The size of Bhutan’s economy is relatively small, with a Gross Domestic Product of less than two billion dollars. But education and healthcare are completely free. All citizens are guaranteed a free basic school education, and those who work hard are provided with a free college education. The state also guarantees the basic human need of housing. If a citizen does not have a house, the government will assist them in finding a place to live, under the oversight of the Ministry of Happiness. Young Bhutanese learn how to achieve happiness in their lives from a young age. Bhutan is one of the countries which has been impacted the least by the pandemic. The king, government officials, and the general population all worked hand in hand to respond to the pandemic, and the king personally traveled to many remote areas to warn his people.
Културни следи по света
2021-12-29   328 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-12-29

Indigenous Folk Tales of Jeju Island, Seolmundae Halmang and Goddesses

17:07

Indigenous Folk Tales of Jeju Island, Seolmundae Halmang and Goddesses

Jeju, which means “a town across the sea,” is the largest island in Korea. At the center of the island lies Hallasan, the highest mountain in Korea which reaches 1,947 meters above sea level. In addition to Hallasan National Park, designated as a UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site. Since ancient times, Hallasan has been worshiped as a sacred mountain where the gods and deities reside. Seolmundae Halmang is a goddess who is said to have created Jeju Island. Halmang means grandmother in the Jeju dialect. “It is said that long ago, Seolmundae Halmang built Hallasan mountain and Jeju Island by carrying stones and soil in the hem of her skirt and pouring it into the middle of the sea. The meaning of Halla is ‘a mountain that pulls the Milky Way.’ When Seolmundae Halmang first made Mt. Halla, it was like you can touch Milky Way from the top of the Mountain.” “It can be said that the legend reveals the existence of the female myth before the myths of patriarchy were formed. So, for example, before the male-centered myths were formed in the Bronze Age or Iron Age, there were stories of women who ruled over humans.” It is believed that there are 18,000 gods in Jeju. Among them is Yeongdeung Halmang who is the goddess of the winds and the sea. “It is believed that Yeongdeung Halmang, the goddess of wind, crosses this sea and sows the seeds of abundance in Jeju Island, bringing the energy of spring and life.” “Jeju Island has a lot of stories about goddesses.” There is also a story about a vegan goddess who only ate tree fruit. “The heart of the goddess who cherishes life is still passed down as a story among people like this.” Jeju, which has been blessed by many gods, preserves its clean and beautiful nature. Jeju is also taking the lead in adopting clean energy for a sustainable future and environmental preservation. In 2009, Supreme Master Ching Hai remotely participated in the international conference “Children’s Health & Sustainable Planet” held in Jeju, and spoke about the province’s beautiful nature and people. “We have just been exchanging notes and I’m sure if I go there today or another day I would absolutely enjoy the company of your people, and the fresh air and the unique landscape, and the tall mountain and sparkling sea that your island possesses, and the warm people of Korea that I had many times the honor to experience. I love Korea. I love Korean people. I truly do.”
Културни следи по света
2021-12-22   351 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-12-22

The Maasai – Looking to the Future with Wisdom

17:02

The Maasai – Looking to the Future with Wisdom

The Maasai culture has a long history. Modern Maasai today live in northern, central, and southern Kenya as well as northern Tanzania, with about 150,000 residing in each country. The Olmaa word for God is Ngai, and it is considered neither male nor female. Ngai is the Creator of all. It is also believed that Ngai endows each person with a guardian spirit to protect them, and to transport them away at the end of their life. The Maasai are largely known for their culture. Images of the statuesque Maasai adorned in bright red garments around the shoulders and waist abound. “In that tribe, the reason we are famous is because of our traditional values which we inherited from our forefathers from generation to generation. The values of responsibility, respect, courage, and wisdom. These are the values that have kept us together as a community from time immemorial.” Maasai warrior training is an important tradition for boys. During one of the final coming-of-age ceremonies for warriors, the Adumu, also known as the traditional Maasai dance, takes place. After the ceremony, the males have reached the status of a warrior. The Maasai are skilled at making jewelry, especially beaded jewelry. The ornamental pieces that are worn tells a story about the person’s social status and life experiences. Nowadays, jewelry making provides Maasai women with a unique opportunity to earn more income. Maasai Elder Emmanuel Milia Mankura has explained that as a leader, he encourages education in the youth and helps to empower women in varied ways such as stopping female circumcision. He helps the community to see the strengths of women. In leading his people, he also works to expand the community’s thinking beyond previous mindsets. This includes advocating for more equality between genders, and encouraging the growing of crops which was once considered taboo. “And in order for us to be successful, to have a sustainable community, it was very important to include the women and the ladies in the community.” Another area that has seen a change to traditional roles is young Maasai men becoming Lion Guardians as opposed to lion predators. Founded in 2007 by Dr. Leela Hazzah and Dr. Stephanie Dolrenry, Lion Guardians is dedicated to finding and enacting long-term solutions to enable lions and humans to coexist with each other.
Културни следи по света
2021-12-17   231 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-12-17

Suez Canal: Connecting the World through Trade

15:49

Suez Canal: Connecting the World through Trade

On March 23, 2021, the giant container ship Ever Given ran aground and blocked the Suez Canal, the key waterway between the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The incident made international headlines in all major media for over a week and drew global attention. After the event, more than 360 vessels waited to pass through the Canal, a maritime traffic jam that not only worried the Egyptians, as the Canal is a major resource for their economy, but also held up at least US$9 billion in trade per day and caused the world to fear a tight supply of oil as the market reacted considerably. The Suez Canal is a human-made waterway that connects the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. The canal extends 193 km in length from the northern terminus of Port Said to the southern terminus in the city of Suez. Owned and operated by the Suez Canal Authority, the Canal took ten years to build and officially opened in November 1869. In the 1830s, Louis Maurice Adolphe Linant de Bellefonds brought up the idea of a direct route. As a French explorer and engineer who specialized in Egypt, he did a survey to disprove the popular belief that the two seas were at different altitudes, and confirmed the contrary, making the construction foreseeable and feasible. Then in the 1850s, His Excellency Mohamed Sa'id Pasha, Wāli of Egypt and Sudan granted French diplomat Ferdinand de Lesseps permission to create a company, later known as the Suez Canal Company, to build a canal. This single blockage caused unexpected delays and economic losses for countries in remote parts of the world, affecting lives millions of miles away. Perhaps the event will serve as an epiphany for humanity that each component, factor or detail, either large or small, contributes to the wellness of the whole. As Supreme Master Ching Hai says: “Because we are all one, there’s no differentiating where the problem will break out. So if somebody does some bad things here, the problem might break out elsewhere.”
Културни следи по света
2021-12-08   261 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-12-08

Japanese Traditional Crafts, Part 2 of 2 – Washi and Suminagashi: The Arts of Paper Making and Paper Marbling

13:17

Japanese Traditional Crafts, Part 2 of 2 – Washi and Suminagashi: The Arts of Paper Making and Paper Marbling

Traditional Japanese paper is called washi. The term is nowadays used to describe paper made by hand from local fibers that are washed, boiled, beaten, and then strained using traditional techniques. The fibers used for washi are often selected from gampi trees, a group of Japanese shrubs that have been used for making paper since the eighth century. Besides for writing and painting, washi can be used to make a wide range of arts and crafts, including even boxes for gifts, candles, or other special items. It takes many years of training and practice at traditional techniques to make washi of consistent size and thickness. Mr. Ichibei Iwano is a 9th-generation paper craftsman from Ehizen Washi, a small city in Fukui Prefecture on the West coast of Honshu, Japan’s main island that has a history of papermaking spanning more than 1,500 years. Mr. Iwano has been designated a Living National Treasure by the Japanese government. Mr. Iwano says that to make the best quality paper, it’s important that he has a calm mind, without any anger or irritation. In Suminagashi, which means “floating ink,” concentric circles of differently colored dyes are floated in multiple layers on the surface of the water, and then the pattern is broken by blowing on it or fanning it with a fan, creating a unique and delicate striped pattern. Washi paper is then immersed in the ink to copy the pattern. This type of artwork is sometimes called “paper marbling” in English, and it has a history of many thousands of years around the world. While washi paper is the traditional medium for suminagashi, nowadays cloth is also used to copy the special pattern to kimonos, the traditional Japanese clothing. The beauty of suminagashi creations, along with its associated culture and traditions, attracts many people to the art, both in Japan and abroad. Mr. Tadao Fukuda is a 91-year-old craftsman from Japan who has been certified as a holder of the title Intangible Cultural Property for his expertise in suminagashi. He uses a fan that is designed to create just the right amount of wind to create a pattern with a unique, beautiful texture. And to preserve the pattern, he uses a special piece of washi paper called a "torinoko-shi" made by him. Echizen Washi has been famous for its torinoko-shi since the Muromachi Period (1336-1573).
Културни следи по света
2021-12-01   342 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-12-01

Japanese Traditional Crafts, Part 1 of 2 - Kintsugi: Finding Beauty in Mending Pottery

14:22

Japanese Traditional Crafts, Part 1 of 2 - Kintsugi: Finding Beauty in Mending Pottery

Japan has a long history of ceramics, dating back to the Jōmon period (c. 14,000 – 300 BC), when pottery became widespread in the country, including for decorative purposes. Japanese potters have used lacquer in their work since around 2,400 BC. Traditional Japanese lacquer is commonly called urushi lacquer because it’s made from the sap of the urushi tree. In Kintsugi, lacquer is used to repair broken pottery, but then instead of hiding the cracks or repairs, a sprinkling of gold, silver or platinum is added to enhance it. If gold is used, the process is called “kintsugi,” where “kin” means “gold” and “tsugi” means “joinery.” With a delicate touch of kintsugi and a little bit of TLC, broken items gain a new life and dignity, symbolizing the beauty of healing and rebirth. The Zen Buddhist aesthetic behind Kintsugi is connected with the Japanese ideal of mushin a state of mind free from anger, fear, and ego. A person who has achieved a state of mushin accepts and embraces change and fate as aspects of human existence, so he or she recognizes, and even celebrates the beauty in broken, imperfect things. Mr. Hidetoshi Nobu is a second-generation kintsugi master from Takeo town in Saga Prefecture in Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s main islands. Mr. Nobu is so skilled at kintsugi that he frequently restores historical artwork for museums and art dealers. He has seen a rise in the number of requests from private individuals over the past few decades. Mr. Nobu also teaches kintsugi workshops around Japan. Another famous kintsugi enthusiast and teacher is Mr. Kunio Nakamura, the owner of the Sixth Dimension bookstore cafe in Ogikubo, Tokyo, where he hosts kintsugi classes. As a freelance director of art and travel shows, Mr. Nakamura has visited over 40 countries, and has written many books on the art of Kintsugi. Kintsugi is increasingly being recognized as a method of quieting and healing the mind. By tending to the cracks and broken pieces and creating something beautiful from them, one learns to appreciate life’s flaws and imperfections, and that opportunities for healing, growth, and transformation are always present.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-24   683 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-24

The Charming Culture of Belize, Part 2 of 2

15:03

The Charming Culture of Belize, Part 2 of 2

The ancient architecture is well represented by the two tallest stone buildings remaining, the Mayan pyramids at Caracol and Xunantunich. There is also the fascinating but unexcavated Pilar city, which is probably the largest classic era Mayan city in Belize. The wisdom and talents of the Belizean people are reflected in their traditional and modern artworks, including paintings, sculptures, and ceramic creations. The traditional Mayan arts heritage “carved slate bas-reliefs” are still produced by talented artisans in the western districts of Belize. Traditional local handcrafts, such as woven Mayan baskets, are being well preserved for future generations by local women, especially in the Maya Village of Toledo. The Qʼeqchiʼ Maya in Belize are especially well-known for the beauty and sophistication of their textiles, which Mayan women have been weaving since the Mayan Age. The artistic Belizean people celebrate plenty of festivals. The biggest festivals of the year include Easter, Belize Independence Day, Christmas Day, the Belize City Carnival, Garifuna Settlement Day and traditional Maya Festivals. The traditional Garifuna musical instruments include the drums, the banjo, the accordion, and the guitar. Two local Belizean music genres are punta and punta rock, which were developed by Garifuna musicians. Founding member of the National Kriol Council, the “Queen of Brukdown” Leela Vernon, was awarded an “Order of the British Empire” in 2007 and designated as a “National Hero” in 2016 by the Belizean National Institute of Culture and History for her contributions to the Kriol Language, Music and Culture of Belize. Traditional Maya music and dance are an important part of the cultural heritage of Belize. The traditional Maya deer dance is a custom play that depicts the relationship between the Maya people and nature. Mayan ancestors passed down the deer dance performance to remind their future generations of the value and importance of nature and these precious animal-people friends. Belize is a vegan-friendly land, with rice and beans being the classic staples. In most common restaurants, one can find vegan options, or steamed vegetables and a wide variety of fruits readily available. Some pasta dishes are also vegan.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-21   224 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-21

Traditional Musical Instrument: Kora of West Africa

17:50

Traditional Musical Instrument: Kora of West Africa

There are countless different types of musical instruments in the world. How did musical instruments come about and what inspired their ingenious inventors? Supreme Master Ching Hai once revealed the following knowledge to us: “In ancient times, the spiritual practitioners who are connected to Heaven, at times tried to replicate the mesmerizing, wonderful music of the celestial abode by creating instruments. So, many of the instruments we have –like the harp, the piano, the violin, the flute, the Scottish bagpipes, etc. – they all correlate with the sounds of real Heavenly realms, except the real ones are much more incredibly uplifting.” The kora is a unique plucked string musical instrument that’s played extensively in West Africa. This hand-made harp-lute instrument belongs to the family of calabash harps in the West African Mandinka culture. As one of the most sacred musical instruments in this region, it’s said that the kora is able to facilitate communication between members of different cultures. The kora is played in Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Senegal, Burkina Faso, and The Gambia. In Guinea, kora players are called lute carriers, while in Senegal they are known as carriers of a hand drum, sabar. The origin of the kora is closely linked to the Jalis of the Mali Empire. A traditional kora player is called a korafola and is a successor of the Jali families of oral historians, genealogists and storytellers. The kora has a combination of lute-like and harp-like features. Typically, the instrument has 21 strings and is played by plucking with the fingers. In recent years, as a compassionate alternative to the traditional materials, wooden soundboard has been adopted by some artists to create vegan koras that sound amazing and look stylish. Music for the kora is a part of the oral tradition of West Africa and its written form has only been present since the 20th century. Some traditional kora music is recorded by ethnomusicologists in the normal grand staff method using the G clef and F clef. Africa’s first female griot kora virtuoso is Sona Jobarteh. Her grandfather was the master Griot, Amadu Bansang Jobarteh. Sona Jobarteh is a renowned singer and composer who blends traditional music with blues and Afropop to produce impressive pieces of music.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-17   300 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-17

The Charming Culture of Belize, Part 1 of 2

15:44

The Charming Culture of Belize, Part 1 of 2

Belize is located on the northeastern coast of Central America. Belmopan is the capital city, while the largest city is Belize City. In addition to the official language of English, over ten distinct languages are spoken in this highly multicultural society, including Belizean Creole (Kriol) and Spanish. As the smallest country in Central America, Belize currently has a population of around 406,000. The nation’s ancient Mayan culture, combined with its peaceful and pluralistic society, make the country a uniquely spiritual and harmonious land. Belizean people are very friendly to each other, and courtesy is of utmost importance in this traditional society. Acquaintances will often stop to spend several minutes chatting when they meet each other unexpectedly, and it is very common for Belizeans to greet each other on the street even when they do not know each other. With its cultural dynamics and rich heritages, the people of Belize enjoy a wide variety of sports and recreational activities. The multiethnic society of Belize is also reflected in the nation’s music, which is influenced by a unique mix of Creole, Mestizo, Garìfuna, Mayan and European styles. The music of the indigenous Mestizo and Mayan people is characterized by the Marimba, a xylophone-like percussion instrument which derives from an African instrument called a lamellaphone. The brilliant Maya civilization has left many cherished heritage sites in Belize, including 10 Mayan Pyramids, which reflect the sophisticated knowledge the ancient Maya people had of the cosmos, such as the relative movement of the Earth and the stars. The Maya people have played a key role in preserving the rainforests of Belize. In 2015 the Maya Leaders Alliance of southern Belize achieved a milestone legal victory in preserving their tenure of their historical homeland; this was the first indigenous people’s land rights victory in a Caribbean country. The Maya Leaders Alliance also actively promotes sustainable forest management and environmental conservation and campaigns to improve services in education, health, and infrastructure for 39 Mayan villages. It was awarded the Prestigious Equator Prize of 2015 for its noble efforts in protecting its indigenous people and precious rainforests.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-14   1007 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-14

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Rubab of Afghanistan

14:48

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Rubab of Afghanistan

How did musical instruments come about and what inspired their ingenious inventors? Supreme Master Ching Hai once revealed the following knowledge to us: “In ancient times, the spiritual practitioners who are connected to Heaven, at times tried to replicate the mesmerizing, wonderful music of the celestial abode by creating instruments. So, many of the instruments we have –like the harp, the piano, the violin, the flute, the Scottish bagpipes, etc. – they all correlate with the sounds of real Heavenly realms, except the real ones are much more incredibly uplifting.” The rubab, one of Afghanistan’s national musical instruments, is affectionately called “The lion of instruments.” The rubab comes in three varieties, the Afghan Kabuli rubab, the Northern Indian Seni rebab and the Tajikistan Pamiri rubab. The smooth, rhythmic, and ethereal sound of the rubab is so uplifting that the venerated Sufi Master and poet Rumi described it as the sound of the Heavenly gates opening the doorway to spiritual enlightenment. Rumi said: “‘He is all-forgiving’ are the words that I hear from the tone of the rebab. The heart-rending strains of paradise I hear from the tone of the rebab. The difference between the way you listen and the way I do, is that for you, the doors of your heart close, for me, the doors open with the tone of the rebab.” This ancient instrument has a history that dates back thousands of years. It’s confirmed to have existed during the 7th century CE and is mentioned widely in ancient Persian literature as well as in numerous Sufi poems. The heavenly sound of the rubab results from its unique construction and the way it’s played. Various sizes of rubab exist, ranging from small, to medium, to large and having 5, 19 and 21 strings respectively. The renowned and highly esteemed Afghan musician Mohammad Omar was Afghanistan’s first rubab performer who excelled in playing the instrument and was awarded the official title of Ustâd in 1949. Another impressive Afghan rubab performer is Ustâd Homayun Sakhi who is from one of Afghanistan’s famous musical families. Homayun is recognized as the current leading master in the rubab arena and is a well-known international rubab virtuoso. He has collaborated with celebrated musicians around the globe and created various passionate compositions.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-10   369 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-10

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 3 of 3

17:23

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 3 of 3

The special arts of traditional Persian miniature painting and calligraphy are deeply rooted in Afghan culture. Persian miniatures is listed in UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The ancient art of calligraphy is deemed sacred in Afghanistan as it is considered a link between the spiritual world and the physical world. Since the 1900s, western art styles have been introduced into Afghanistan and integrated into traditional Afghan artworks. The preferred Afghan fine art forms are mostly realistic oil and watercolor paintings. Afghans have many traditional musical instruments to nurture their body and soul. The national instrument of Afghanistan is the Rubab, which dates back to the 7th Century and is known as “the Lion of Instruments.” The Rubab is often used to accompany Afghan and Persian Sufi poets in their poetry recitals. Like many cultures, Afghan traditional music and dance can be enjoyed at festivals and celebrations such as weddings.Throughout Afghan history many famous writers, poets, scientists, activists, and artists have emerged. The Venerated Enlightened Master Jalāl ad-Dīn Mohammad Rūmī, who is simply known as Rumi, was a world-renowned poet and Islamic scholar in the 13th-century. With his poems translated into countless languages, Rumi is considered one of the most popular poets in the world. Dr. Sima Samar is a famous Afghan women's and human rights advocate, activist, and social worker within national and international platforms. Her contributions have been widely recognized and she has received several prestigious awards. All throughout the year, numerous festivals and celebrations are held in Afghanistan. Nowruz, celebrated between January and March on New Year of the Islamic calendar, is the most popular festival in Afghanistan. Music and dances are performed for celebrations as farmers express gratitude and joy for their crops. Wheat, rice, barley, and cotton are the major agricultural crops of Afghanistan. The traditional food is mostly vegan by default. Beans, lentils, chickpeas, or kidney beans cooked in a thick stew with tomatoes and onions are quite common dishes in Afghanistan.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-27   822 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-27

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 2 of 3

14:38

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 2 of 3

The first traces of human life in Afghanistan were found around 52,000 years ago. The earliest Afghan metal handicrafts can be traced back to the Bronze Age (3,300 to 1,200 BC). Also, over 20,600 gold items, such as coins, necklaces and other jewelry were found in burial mounds in Sheberghan, Jowzjan Province. Another significant form of art in Afghanistan is Gandharan art, a Buddhist art style developed during the 1st and 7th centuries AD. The Buddhas of Bamiyan were two monumental statues of Vairocana Buddha and Gautama Buddha that had been carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamiyan valley of central Afghanistan during the Hephthalites' time. Unfortunately, both statues were destroyed in 2001, leaving huge vacant spaces. In 2003, the Bamiyan Valley was included on UNESCO's World Heritage List and the List of World Heritage in Danger. Later, the art in Afghanistan was deeply influenced by Persian and Islamic culture. Grand mosques were built in the country featuring elaborate tiling styles. Many of these styles and techniques were influenced by Uzbek and Chinese ceramics. Afghanistan is the only place that can produce pottery artwork in this turquoise color. Embroidery and fabric handicrafts are traditional arts practiced throughout the history of Afghanistan and are typically done by women and girls. Each of Afghanistan’s ethnic groups has its own specific style of traditional embroidery. The unique embroidery called Khamak is a trademark of the southern city of Kandahar, and is considered by art experts to be one of the world’s finest embroidery forms. Afghanistan’s traditional clothing is quite conservative. For women, an ankle-length dress is worn with loose-fitting trousers called a tunbaan. A headscarf known as a chador is then worn to cover their hair. The men wear a similar basic outfit consisting of trousers and a loose-fitting shirt with a turban that differs according to where he is from. This clothing style dates back to the early medieval period and the time when Islamic culture was adopted. In 2006 the first Afghan fashion show was held in Kabul, thus opening a new era of traditional fashion in Afghanistan.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-20   550 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-20

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 1 of 3

16:03

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 1 of 3

Afghanistan is a landlocked country located at the crossroads of Central and South Asia. Afghanistan borders Pakistan to the east and south, China to the northeast, Iran to the west, and Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan to the north. Because of its strategically important location connecting the Middle East, India, and the Eurasian Steppe, Afghanistan served as a central gateway on the ancient Silk Road, the famous trade route stretching from the Mediterranean Sea to China. The earliest human traces in the region of Afghanistan go back at least 52,000 years. The earliest written record can be traced back to around 500 BC - the time of the Achaemenid Empire. Today Afghanistan is an Islamic nation, in which over 90% of the population follow Sunni Islam, about 10% are Shia Muslims, and a small percent follow other religions such as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism. Afghanistan is famous for cherished historical sites including forts, minarets, castles, statues, and palaces, as well as ancient crafts, and a variety of art forms. The Citadel of Herat, located in the center of Herat in the fertile Hari River Valley, is also known as the Citadel of Alexander. Between 1976 and 1979, the historic Citadel was excavated and restored by UNESCO, and after experiencing decades of conflict, several international organizations decided to rebuild it. In the historical trade center of Ghazni city, the Ghazni Minarets, the only architectural remnants of the Bahram Shah Mosque and artifacts of the great Ghaznavid Empire, are two elaborately decorated towers built of fired mud bricks in the middle of the 12th century. The Minaret of Jam, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is located in a remote region of the Ghor Province in western Afghanistan. The Minaret of Jam was built of intricate baked bricks around the year 1190 as a monument of the Ghorid Empire.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-13   804 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-13

Suriname: A Unique Blend of Diverse Cultures

14:29

Suriname: A Unique Blend of Diverse Cultures

Located on the northeast coast of South America, Suriname is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the North, French Guiana to the East, Guyana to the West, and Brazil to the South. Paramaribo, the capital city, is home to approximately half of the country’s population. Though the smallest country in South America, Suriname is one of the world’s most diverse countries, so diverse in fact that it doesn’t have a racial majority. While it’s officially considered a Caribbean country, the nation is made up of a unique and beautiful blend of cultures, languages and religious faiths that live together in peace and harmony. Suriname’s cultural fusion is perhaps best reflected in its unique musical genre called Kaseko, which is most popular among Surinamese of African descent. Kaseko blends popular and folk music elements from Africa, Europe, and the Americas. It has a complex rhythm, which is maintained by percussion instruments, while the melody is often played by wind instruments, including the saxophone, the trumpet, and occasionally the trombone. Suriname’s diversity is also reflected in the people’s dress. The most traditional attire for Surinamese of African descent is a beautiful piece of colorful cloth called a Pangi, which is short for Pangani. There are different types of Pangi for different purposes and ceremonies, with different Pangi having fashionable, social and spiritual meanings. The arts and crafts of the Surinamese people have deep roots in the nearby Amazon Rainforest. Maroons are particularly famous for their intricate carvings, which are often in the form of useful household implements such as stools, cabinets and kitchen utensils. Besides its friendly and creative people, Suriname is famous, for its incredible tropical rainforests. The Central Suriname Nature Reserve was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000 for its pristine tropical rainforest ecosystem and its biodiversity. Suriname’s large forested area has made it carbon negative since 2014, meaning that it absorbs more carbon than it emits, thus doing its bit to reduce climate change.
Културни следи по света
2021-09-08   414 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-09-08

The Taíno or “Good People” of the Caribbean

13:08

The Taíno or “Good People” of the Caribbean

The Taíno people are the indigenous people of the Caribbean. They lived in Jamaica, Cuba, Hispaniola (today’s Haiti and Dominican Republic), Puerto Rico, the Bahamas and the Lesser Antilles. The term Taíno is thought to mean “good people,” possibly a reflection of them being a welcoming group who built relationships with neighboring islands largely through travel over water via canoe. Talented canoe constructors, the early Taíno used tree trunks to create boats. The Taíno initially introduced the practice of horticulture to the Caribbean area, including in Antigua and Barbuda. Women were responsible for preparing the food, including cassava which was a staple in the diet.The Taíno were animistic in their spirituality, believing that all things possessed souls or spirits that could be either benevolent or malevolent. Today, many Taíno people recognize how important it is to care for our planet and see this connection with the Earth and nature as an integral part of their spirituality. Valerie Nanaturey Vargas-Estevez makes presentations on and is a teacher of Taíno culture. “So, to me, Taíno spirituality takes a great hold of me on a daily basis, from the moment I open my eyes and look at the sun and I thank Creator for everything. I try my best to take care of our Mother Earth that to me is so paramount. I hope that people understand and start changing the way they live so as to protect our Earth, our stars, our planet, our universe, for our children and all others that live here.” One particular study found that a large portion of Puerto Rican people are Taíno descendants. The findings have been embraced by the Taíno community. Taíno culture is becoming more renowned through the work of various people, such as Dr. Lesley-Gail Atkinson Swaby of Jamaica. Dr. Swaby studied Taíno culture for many years and was inspired to write a children’s book entitled “Boianani: A Taíno Girl’s First Adventure.”
Културни следи по света
2021-09-01   401 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-09-01

The Native Esselen People of North America

16:39

The Native Esselen People of North America

“Inside a cave in a narrow canyon near Tassajara The vault of rock is painted with hands, A multitude of hands in the twilight, a cloud of men’s palms, no more, No other picture. There’s no one to say Whether the brown shy quiet people who are dead intended Religion or magic, or made their tracings In the idleness of art; but over the division of years these careful Signs-manual are now like a sealed message…” The poem “Hands” we just listened to is about the palm imprints found in the caves of Tassajara, which is situated deep in a mountain valley in the secluded Ventana Wilderness of California, the original home of the native Esselen people. The imprints of the palms were made by these people more than 3,000 years ago, and are likely to have either religious or magical significance, as the curious US poet Robinson Jeffers wondered. Jeffers’ succinct messages assert that modern-day humans should not despise these palm imprints by the Esselen as they were also human, and that people should be one with nature and enjoy the pristine beauty of the Tassajara without damaging it. One should not look down on one’s primitive ancestors as being barbaric and uncivilized, but instead bear in mind their relentless struggles for civilization and continued betterment of one generation after another. Civilization and progress are purely relative. So, who exactly are the Esselen people? They are an Indigenous American group whose language is part of the Hokan language family and are native to the Santa Lucia Mountains south of the Big Sur River in Big Sur, Monterey County, California. They used to live both on the coast and inland depending on the season. Men wore little clothing or were bare most of the time, while females may have worn a small apron, and in cold weather they may have applied mud to their bodies to keep warm. Throughout most of the year, the Esselen girls would gather acorns and other items from the forests to make into food. Their staple foods consisted of seeds of many varieties. The Esselen traded acorns, salt, baskets, beads, and other commodities with local tribes. The Esselen are a small tribe with customs similar to those of other California Native American tribes; however, they have different beliefs. To the Esselen people, many things such as the stars, trees, rocks, and minerals have power and are alive. They believe that rocks have memory and honor them by leaving their handprints on rocks.
Културни следи по света
2021-08-25   1101 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-08-25

The Aloha Culture of Hawaii

14:23

The Aloha Culture of Hawaii

In the United States, Hawaii is the happiest state according to a 2020 survey from Wallethub. In this report, Hawaii received top scores in the “Emotional & Physical Well-Being” and “Community & Environment” categories. In addition, Hawaii state has ranked number one in Gallop’s National Health and Wellbeing Index for seven years in a row. Aunty Pilahi Paki, the beloved Hawaiian poet and philosopher, gave a touching account of aloha in the Aloha Chant: “Make this offering a habit, all persons of Hawaii: Obtain oneness, free of duality, Let thoughts be at ease, Emptiness is your anchor, Be with your breath until complete union.” Aunty Pilahi Paki inspired the Aloha Spirit Law. She foresaw that “the world will turn to Hawaii, as they search for world peace because Hawaii has the key – and that key is aloha!” The Aloha Spirit Law passed in 1986 declares: “Aloha Spirit is the coordination of mind and heart within each person. It brings each person to the self. Each person must think and emote good feelings to others… These are traits of character that express the charm, warmth, and sincerity of Hawaii's people. It was the working philosophy of Native Hawaiians and was presented as a gift to the people of Hawaii.” Within each ohana, members are obliged to take care of each other. Hawaiians constantly ask themselves “What can I do for my ohana?” It is through building these loving connections and caring for each other that Hawaiians find true happiness. Like everybody in the world, Hawaiians also have to deal with life’s trials and tribulations, but their approach in dealing with these can teach us something about being happier. We are all connected to each other in so many ways, so, let’s find those connections, and build our own ohanas with the spirit of aloha and ho’ihi, and we will all be nourished in the universal ocean of love. This might just be the secret ingredient of true happiness.
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2021-08-18   760 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-08-18

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 2 of 2

14:57

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 2 of 2

Today we will continue to explore more aboriginal groups in this great country. The Orinoco River is the longest river in South America. The river created the Orinoco basin, a fascinating place with landscapes untouched by colonization. The people of the Basin still keep their indigenous housing styles and use canoes to travel. The Warao tribe is the guardian of the Orinoco River. The word Warao means “the boat people," which reflects their direct relationship with the river. Some live in palafitos, which are thatched huts on stilts above the water. Because the palafitos resemble similar architectural features in Venice, the land was named Venezuela by the Spanish explorer, Alonso de Ojeda, which means “Little Venice.” West of the Orinoco River, in the Llanos region, are the Guahibo and Yaruro tribes. They live in huts made of wild plantain leaves, as well as Jessenia and other palm leaves. The Yaruro are a mobile tribe, moving between the two dry and wet seasons. Their homes use Moriche palms as the main material for thatching the roofs, with Zinc lamina also used on some buildings. The Yanomami tribe lives as a community under a large round-shaped shelter called “Shabonos,” which is made from natural materials such as leaves, vines, and tree trunks.The Los Roques Archipelago consists of an estimated 350 islands north of the La Guaira port. In 1972, the Los Roques Archipelago National Park was created to protect this marine ecosystem of exceptional beauty, consisting of coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrass beds. The Guajira Peninsula is a territory along the Caribbean Coast known for a lively ecology, deep tropical rainforests, an abundance in biodiversity, plentiful clean water, and plenty of fresh air. The El Limón River in Venezuela is the main water source for the Wayuú tribes. Artificial ponds were developed to hold rainwater during the rainy season. Wayuú people have traditional crafts, such as making a variety of styles of bags, or mochilas. The Wayuú women have inherited a strong weaving tradition from their ancestors who, according to legend, learned it from a mythical spider called Walekeru.
Културни следи по света
2021-08-04   639 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-08-04

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 1 of 2

14:46

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 1 of 2

Venezuela is an immigrant based country, consisting of four main ethnic groups: Around 52% of its population are from the Mestizo, a group with a mix of European, Amerindian, and African ancestries; 42 % are of a European descent; 4% are of an African descent; and 2% population are native Venezuelans. The earliest settlers of ancient Venezuela are generally believed to be Siberians who crossed the Bering Strait, connecting Russia and Alaska, during the last glacial period about 23,000 years ago. Though separated into different groups today, DNA research by Harvard Medical School revealed a common ancestry. Their ancestors moved into North America, and then later to Central and South America. Evidence shows that the earliest habitants of northwest Venezuela traces back more than 15,000 years ago. The agriculture system of indigenous Venezuelan was established as early as the 1st millennium. By the end of the 15th century, an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 indigenous people inhabited the current Venezuela region. Today there are 51 indigenous groups currently living in Venezuela, and 44 groups are officially recognized by the government. The largest groups include the Wayuú, Pemón, Warao, Yanomami, and Kariña peoples. The picturesque Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is home to the Pemón tribes. The Pemón's houses are huts with walls made of clay or bark, and roofs made of palm leaves. Besides collecting the food from the wilderness, Pemón men prepare the soil for planting and the women garden, harvest, and transport crops.Pemón's living area, the Gran Sabana, with its gorgeous sceneries, has become a tourist attraction place and provides the main source of income for the locals. For the last three years, while the economy and tourism have been slow, the Pemón people in the Kavanayén village have resisted lucrative offers from the mining industry, and have returned to a more environmentally responsible way of living, with traditional farming. The traditional farming fosters teamwork in families and the community. By working together, they also reduce their carbon footprint on the planet. This keeps their spirits and optimism high, even through difficult times.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-28   795 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-28

The Brokpa People - Vegans for Thousands of Years

11:21

The Brokpa People - Vegans for Thousands of Years

The Brokpa are a unique indigenous community mostly living in the Ladakh area of India. They are also known as the Brogpa or Drogpa. They refer to themselves as Minaro, which means “Aryan.” The term Aryan in the ancient Indian language of Sanskrit translates as “distinguished” or “noble” and historically refers to a light-skinned people who spoke an Indo-European language. They entered ancient India and influenced the culture, literature and religion of the locals.One school of thought on their origin posits that the Brokpa people may be descendants of troops that were left behind by Alexander the Great. It has been noted that the Brokpa folk songs describe their migration route that ties in with this theory, and Alexander the Great is believed to have left his troops in Dardistan or modern-day Pakistan. For somewhere between 2,000 and 5,000 years, the Brokpa maintained a strict vegan diet, meaning they excluded animal products including meat, eggs, and dairy. This age-old way of eating is tied to their traditional spiritual beliefs that the world is divided into three different spheres, including a realm of gods, a realm of people and a lower realm consisting of water spirits. The Brokpa belief is that these worlds are connected by a tree that makes communication between them possible. In order to link with the realm of the gods, there is an emphasis on purity. Brokpa women are respected and honored. This is because women have the power of producing life and carrying on the bloodline of the community. As a result of this, they enjoy freedom and mutual respect within their families and villages. During the Bono-na festival, the women dress up in their finest clothing and walk around slowly in a circle performing a courtship dance, at the same time singing folk songs, and calling out to the men to join them. The women also propose marriage. A distinguishing feature of the Brokpa is their love of flowers. The colorful headgear called “tepi” has numerous decorations attached and is adorned with vibrant flowers. Wearing tepi is considered a way to repel evil influences. The women also wear gold, silver, and other metal jewelry, which are not only decorative but also are believed to have protective qualities. The community members also rely on herbal medicine in order to cure their sick.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-21   792 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-21
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