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Категория : Културни следи по света
Дата : Всичко
Сортирай : Най-популярни
Субтитри : Всичко

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Delightful European Recorder

19:37

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Delightful European Recorder

The recorder sings, excites, and soothes across the ranges of the upper musical spectrum. Historical mentions of the recorder, a member of the woodwind family, began to appear during the Renaissance in the 16th century. After a quiet interlude spanning several decades, the recorder was brought back into the mainstream at the end of the 19th century by certain virtuoso players such as Frans Brüggen. In the 20th century, there were two main branches of recorder development. One involved repertoire and performance enhancements, while the other focused on modern woodwind making. Originally, recorders were made of wood, but today's recorders are also constructed from other materials, including plastic, ceramic, and resin. Due to their rich and smooth tones, wooden recorders are often preferred in performances. The sound of the recorder is truly divine, as it takes us far away from worldly concerns.
Културни следи по света
2020-04-08   913 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-04-08

The Tradition of Respecting the Elderly, Part 2 of 2

13:49

The Tradition of Respecting the Elderly, Part 2 of 2

Senior citizens are an invaluable source of precious wisdom and provide us with love, understanding, and advice whenever we are in need. In Greek culture, elders are associated with wisdom and closeness to God. In ancient times, sages and oracles were mostly associated with the wise older men and women. It was noted in the history of ancient Sparta that politeness for elders was customary. In Ancient Rome, elders were respected for their wisdom and virtue , and were often looked up to as role models for the young. In many European nations, especially northern countries such as Sweden, Norway, and Germany, are deemed the “best region in the world for the elderly.” Governments ensure their seniors are well cared for by providing quality healthcare and generous pensions. Africans regard their elders as treasures, and expected to pass down knowledge, beliefs, and precious traditions to the younger generations. In Australia, the native Aboriginal people believe that respect is an essential virtue everyone must have, and is the foundation of harmonious relationships between humans, and with the natural environment. Care and respect for our elders is also an important principle in many religious doctrines.
Културни следи по света
2020-03-11   912 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-03-11

The Heiltsuk of British Columbia: Take a little, Leave a Lot

14:11

The Heiltsuk of British Columbia: Take a little, Leave a Lot

During our time together, we will learn about a resourceful group of individuals in Western Canada called the Heiltsuk. Most of the Heiltsuk today live in the village of Bella Bella. The Heiltsuk have a well-defined code of ethics and morality, which has historically been taught through their oral tradition, music, dance, and artwork. The word Heiltsuk literally means “to speak or act correctly,” which encompasses how people are to behave in everyday and ceremonial life. They have a well-defined system of traditional laws that have been upheld by their Hereditary Chiefs for thousands of years. They view these rules of their ancestors as the overriding principles for all resource use and environmental management. A core belief is that they should “take a little and leave a lot.” Fundamental to these ideas is the concept that all things are connected and unity is important to maintain. The Heiltsuk have historically been known as artisans who excelled in creating canoes, bentwood boxes, chests, ladles, and other objects. While there are certain aspects of Heiltsuk art that are shared with other groups in the Pacific Northwest, including crest imagery and totemic designs, each tribe has its own unique features and styles. As a maritime people, they used the canoe as their main form of transportation, trading, and communication with other groups for thousands of years. There were many varied styles that were made for different purposes, including ocean-going and river canoes, as well as ones for trading goods and freighting, ceremonies, transportation, and racing. The House of the Heiltsuk is a sacred place that is used for both governance and ceremony. It is where their ancestors visit them from the spirit world and where they can go back and forth between the worlds during ceremony. Step-by-step, the Heiltsuk have been working to strengthen and rejuvenate their cultural heritage, by finding ways to honor their customs and values while living and working in the modern age. As we have discovered today, they have great beauty to share with the world through their artistry and craftmanship, and a moral code of governance.
Културни следи по света
2020-07-21   906 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-07-21

Brunei: The Abode of Peace

15:29

Brunei: The Abode of Peace

Brunei is located on the northwestern side of the tropical island of Borneo. The island is also home to parts of Malaysia and Indonesia. The national flag features an image of two hands, representing the benevolent hands of the government and its promise to provide welfare, peace, and prosperity to the people, as well as the national motto (in Arabic): “Render service unto God’s Guidance.” The people of Brunei enjoy a diverse culture owing to the country’s unique history, which includes thousands of years of cultural, political, and economic exchanges with India and China, and its recent connections with the United Kingdom. As many citizens of Brunei are ethnic Malays, the nation enjoys strong cultural ties with Malaysia. Islam, the national religion, strongly influences the culture and lifestyle of Brunei’s Muslims, who make up about 80% of the population. The sense of community is extremely valued in the Bruneian culture. The term “gotong-royong,” which literally means “working together,” conveys the spirit in which people should function in unity for the common good. Brunei’s traditional and popular attire is influenced by Islam. For over 500 years, Brunei is renowned for its metalwork, especially silverwork, and the high-quality crafts produced by its artisans. Traditional woven textiles, known locally as “kaintenunan Brunei,” have played an important role among both royalty and ordinary people for centuries; for example, they’re given by the groom to his bride in their wedding ceremony. Basket making, called “menganyam,” is another traditional handicraft. Bamboo, rattan (climbing palms) and the leaves of other plants are woven into a wide variety of baskets and items for daily use. The nation’s Islamic roots also play a prominent role in music and dance. Common traditional instruments include gongs and coconut shells, which are used for percussion. Many tourists also visit the Kampong Ayer settlement, the historic capital of the Bruneian Empire, which is sometimes known as the “Venice of the East.” With its amazing tropical rainforests, noble people, magnificent Islamic architecture, and flouring traditional arts, Brunei will impress any traveler.
Културни следи по света
2021-07-14   898 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-07-14

Danish Cultural Art, Part 2 of 2

14:11

Danish Cultural Art, Part 2 of 2

Today, we’ll examine Denmark’s unique architecture, handicrafts, visual arts, and literature. Kronborg Castle has been standing above a narrow cape between the coasts of Denmark and Sweden for six centuries. It is well known as the home of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The Castle, widely recognized as one of Europe’s most outstanding Renaissance castles, was adopted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000. One of the most popular and famous Danish designs is the Grand Prix chair, considered to be among the most successful chair designs of the 20th century. Its simple, elegant form and suitability for mass production contributed to its success. In 1957 the designer Arne Jacobsen won the Grand Prix for the chair at the Triennale Exhibition in Milan. Another distinctive Danish folk art practice is silversmithing. Danish artists have long created beautiful tools and utensils made of silver. For example, in the early 1900’s the world-renowned Danish silversmith Georg Jensen and his workshop produced amazing designs such as “The Adam and Eve Buckle,” “Bird Eating Berries Brooch,” “Pregnant Duck Pitcher,” and many other pieces of fine jewelry and dinnerware. Danish visual arts can be traced back to significant artifacts from the 2nd millennium BC, such as the Trundholm Sun Chariot. Viking art has been strongly influential and many examples have survived up to the present day. For example, many Viking stone monuments still stand untouched in the Danish countryside. And church frescos from the Medieval Period are well preserved. Portrait painting was also popular among members of the Danish court and aristocracy during the Middle Ages. Denmark’s most famous author, Hans Christian Andersen, wrote a book of fairy tales consisting of 156 stories that have been translated into more than 125 languages. At least nine of his tales have been made into films and loved by many generations around the world, as they uplift our spirits and spark our imaginations.
Културни следи по света
2021-03-03   885 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-03-03

Danish Cultural Art, Part 1 of 2

14:46

Danish Cultural Art, Part 1 of 2

“Out in the meadows the grain has been cradled; rye and wheat are stacked, and hay will soon be in the barn. Trees have been shaken and fruit has been gathered, and homeward now we wend our way with the final load. We plow the field lightly; it’s an old custom, as the birds and the poor must also be satiated…” We just heard one of Denmark’s most famous folk songs, “Marken er mejet,” or “Harvest Song,” which depicts the happy harvest season of the Danish people. According to the United Nations World Happiness Report, Denmark is the happiest country in the world and its capital Copenhagen the happiest city. Today, we’re happy to share with you the fascinating art forms of Danish folk music and dance. Traditional music was the common musical culture of Denmark until around 1900, when classical music was introduced and folk music became marginalized to rural areas. The folk instruments of Denmark include the lur, the accordion‎, the giga, the hummel, and the fiddle. Included in the culture of Danish folk music is a special musical genre called “Morgensang,” which means communal morning singing. The idea of singing together is generally a big part of people’s lives, and Danes of all ages still maintain this tradition by singing together at universities and offices. Morgensang is also an important part of the Danish Samfundssind culture, which promotes community spirit and social-mindedness. Dancing in a big circle around Christmas trees is another old and unique Danish tradition. Danes first admire the Christmas tree for a while, and then do their folk dance in a circle. This custom is part of the Danish Hygge culture, which involves creating a warm atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with good people. At Danish folk festivals, the Danish Sønderhoning dance, a kind of polka dance, and longways set dances are frequently performed. Almost all Danish folk dances are simple, easy-going, and gentle, with the purpose of promoting social or educational engagement.
Културни следи по света
2021-02-25   870 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-02-25

The Māori Tūhoe People- Guardians of the Sacred Te Urewera Rainforest

14:24

The Māori Tūhoe People- Guardians of the Sacred Te Urewera Rainforest

Today, we visit Oceania to learn about the Māori Tūhoe. New Zealand is a country located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. It comprises two main islands, namely, the North Island and South Island plus about 600 other smaller islands. The nation has a population of about 5 million, of which the majority are of European descent, with the Māori forming the most significant minority and then followed by Asians and Pacific Islanders. The Māori call New Zealand Aotearoa. This means the “land of the long white cloud” in the Māori language. They are the original inhabitants of New Zealand, having arrived in the 14th century from Eastern Polynesia. A distinct group of about 40,000 Māori is called the Tūhoe people who are the focus of today’s program. Te Urewera, the Tūhoe’s homeland, is located in New Zealand's North Island. It covers approximately 2,127 square kilometers of rugged hill country and features vast blue-green lakes and fast-running north-flowing rivers. The individuals living in these areas take care of the rainforest. Te Urewera is extremely important to the Tūhoe people, as historically it has been their primary source of food, clothing, medicine, shelter and dignity. The Tūhoe people protect Te Urewera as a precious site via an ancient Māori practice known as kaitiakitanga, which means “guardianship,” through caring and maintaining the ecological system and environment. The key point of the practice is to understand the connection and relationship of people and nature. Humans are linked to the wild and need to protect and care for the mauri, or life force of the forests, rivers and lakes. This involves daily checking of the condition of the woodlands and water bodies through the observation and collection of data, replenishing and planting of native plants and trees, and safeguarding all habitats thus balancing the ecology within the rainforest and its surroundings. To the Tūhoe, mountains are significant places as they are the final resting place of their ancestors. Mountains are reflected in Tūhoe oral traditions, songs and haka or dance as significant symbols of identity. The Tūhoe certainly respect nature. We now share some examples of Tūhoe traditions.
Културни следи по света
2020-09-15   867 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-09-15

Advanced Inventions of Ancient Egypt, Part 1 of 2

16:11

Advanced Inventions of Ancient Egypt, Part 1 of 2

Egypt is a transcontinental country that connects Africa and Asia with a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula, bordered by the Gulf of Aqaba and the Red Sea to the east, Sudan to the south, Libya to the west, and the states of Palestine and Israel to the northeast. The longest river in the world, the Nile flows north-south through Egypt, and millennia-old monuments stand along the Nile River Valley, including the colossal Pyramids of Giza and the Great Sphinx. Egypt has one of the longest histories in the world, tracing its civilization and cultural heritage along the Nile Delta back at least as far as 6000 BC. Today, we will journey through ancient Egyptian inventions in astronomy, timekeeping, architecture, and shipbuilding.Ancient Egyptians clearly felt a close connection with the universe, and Egyptian astronomy traces back to earlier than 5000 BC, when celestial alignments appear to have inspired the astronomical site at Nabta Playa. The earliest known traces of sundials were also discovered in Egypt, and date to around 3500 BC, while a surviving limestone sundial showing greater complexity in design, dates back to 1500 BC and was discovered in the Valley of the Kings in 2013.According to historical evidence, the ancient Egyptians invented many simple building tools, such as scaffolds, ramps and the lever, and used them to help construct the pyramids as far back as 4,500 years ago. Simple but effective surveying tools, such as a plumb bob, a cubit rod for short measurements, and a calibrated rope of 100 cubits for longer distances, were used in field measurement. These effective construction methods made it possible to build Aten, the largest ancient city, which was established around 3,000 years ago.An Egyptian pharaoh's “Solar Boat,” dating back to around 4,500 years ago, possesses the most advanced shipbuilding technologies in ancient Egypt. Based on their prolific innovations in shipbuilding and navigation, ancient Egypt became the first country in the world to possess a navy. Many early Egyptian inventions and technological advances demonstrate a high level of wisdom within their ancient civilization, which has formed the basis of many technologies still used to this day.
Културни следи по света
2022-03-02   865 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2022-03-02

The Spiritual Lumad Societies of Mindanao

15:55

The Spiritual Lumad Societies of Mindanao

The Lumad people encompass a collection of indigenous people from the Mindanao region. This area is the second-largest island in the Philippines and also includes smaller islands surrounding the main landmass. The Lumad people or Lumadnon, consist of approximately 18 major groups. The island of Mindanao contains a significant portion of forested and protected areas, many of which are ancestral lands of the Lumadnon and have spiritual affiliations. Hence, the Lumad people consistently advocate for conservation and environmental protection. The island is home to threatened animal and plant species such as the Philippine Eagle, Philippine warty pig, and the Rafflesia schadenbergiana. This is known as the largest flower in the world and a valuable tourist attraction. The Lumadnon have traditionally followed an animistic path of spirituality, and there is a wide-held belief that certain deities affect people and the communities. Many of the spirits are linked to beings in the natural world including plants, lakes, areas of native land, and animals. Water bodies have significant spiritual ties for many of the groups. Among the Bagobo community, the limokon or turtle dove is believed to be a messenger of the gods, while the T’boli view it as the spirit of their ancestors communicating with them. Signs from the spirit world are also sought for guidance around farming. Among the Lumadnon, spirituality and crafts are also interwoven. Certain Lumad communities such as Bagobo, T’boli, Mandaya, Kulaman, and B’laan are known as master weavers. They create eye-catching cloth and elaborate clothes with vibrant patterns and colors. The late Lang Dulay was considered to be a master weaver of the T’nalak. In 1998, this inspiring woman was named as a National Living Treasure by the Philippine government’s National Commission for Culture and the Arts. Various Lumad groups are also highly skilled in metalsmithing. This includes the Teduray, Bagobo, Mandaya, and T’boli. Various works of jewelry and adornment have been made, often out of brass, including belts, bracelets, chains, anklets, and bells. Each Lumad group is a testament to the diverse history, knowledge, customs, traditions, and beauty of the indigenous Philippine peoples.
Културни следи по света
2021-03-10   846 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-03-10

Traditional Music Instrument: The Bandoneon, Part 1 of 2

16:28

Traditional Music Instrument: The Bandoneon, Part 1 of 2

“In ancient times, the spiritual practitioners who are connected to Heaven, at times tried to replicate the mesmerizing, wonderful music of the celestial abode by creating instruments. So, many of the instruments we have – like the harp, the piano, the violin, the flute, the Scottish bagpipes, etc. – they all correlate with the sounds of real Heavenly realms, except the real ones are much more incredibly uplifting.”The bandoneon is a type of concertina that originated in Germany but is especially popular in some South American and Eastern European countries, such as Argentina, Uruguay, and Lithuania. The bandoneon falls into the category of bellows-driven free-reed instruments known as squeezeboxes, and is an essential instrument in most tango ensembles in Argentina and Uruguay, and in Lithuanian folk music groups.Being a portable aerophone instrument, the bandoneon consists of two square wooden boxes with buttons on the sides connected by a folding bellows. Each of the wooden boxes contains a small reed organ operated by a few rows of buttons. The bellows consists of three panels of six slices. Similar to other concertinas, it is held between both hands. By pulling and pushing, players expand and contract the bellows, providing air to the reed organs which then produce the sounds. Pressing selected buttons directs air to specific reeds. The full tonal range of the bandoneon is five octaves. The left-hand keyboard is set at three lower octaves from C2 to B4, while the right-hand keyboard is set at three higher octaves from A3 to B6. The bandoneon is like a combination of two different instruments with the left sounding like a cello’s warming sounds, while the right is closer to a trumpet’s sharp timbres. One of the most important aspects of bandoneon playing technique is posture. Developing a good technique allows a player to achieve maximum results with minimum effort. The relationship between the hands, arms, legs, and torso is of vital importance. Hence, a good posture can give a player countless possibilities for expression, dynamics, and control over the instrument. The bandoneon can be played sitting or standing. The former, being more common, allows the player to use one or two knees to support the instrument, and is also the recommended posture for practicing. Standing is good for certain types of music and concerts as it gives stronger effects.
Културни следи по света
2021-05-12   840 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-05-12

The Melodic Hearts and Spirit of the Garifuna People

15:00

The Melodic Hearts and Spirit of the Garifuna People

Today we are delighted to share the rich and vibrant culture of the Garifuna. The community has traditionally been a matrilineal society, where women make decisions and safeguard the members. These lively people are of West African and Amerindian descent, with many living along the Caribbean coast of Belize, Honduras, Nicaragua and Guatemala. To quote the late Andy Palacio, also known as the “Bard of the Garifuna”: “For the Garifuna, music and dance are inextricably linked with survival. Music accompanies us every day, whether we’re at work or play. It is the breath that keeps us alive collectively. At its highest level, it’s an expression of our spirituality.” Traditional Garifuna music is known for strong use of percussive instruments and distinctive drumming, which combines the beats of the primero (tenor) and segunda (bass) drums. Dance is another integral component of Garifuna culture. The most popular genre of dance is punta. Punta is also a type of song which is usually composed by women. The dance is a symbolic reenactment of courtship between a rooster and hen. It involves the constant shaking of the hips and movement of the legs and feet. This dance is performed at social gatherings and during points of the beluria, a gathering with many rituals that takes place nine days after someone has passed on. In Belize, the punta is danced annually every November 19 during the Garifuna Settlement Day, a public holiday that celebrates the Garifuna’s arrival to the nation in 1802. Music and dance also play a role in Garifuna religion, called Gobedah. Wanayran Alvarez Angerer, director of the nonprofit Moving Cultures, has described the religion as being multilayered. Garifuna spirituality involves praying and being connected to one’s ancestors. Certain rituals are performed that help join the community with the greater energy. The second layer includes Amerindian traditions. The third component comprises of religious teachings such as those of the Catholic Church.
Културни следи по света
2021-02-10   835 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-02-10

Kite Flying Around the World

15:13

Kite Flying Around the World

There is something magical about flying a kite on a fine day. With each pull and release of the string, the kite soars higher and higher. Watching it drift gracefully in the open space brings such simple happiness, satisfaction and contentment to our hearts. It’s no wonder kite flying has been such an enjoyable pastime for people of all ages and nationalities. Kites can be made from paper, plastic, or textiles, such as ripstop, nylon or Dacron. Those made from plastic and textiles are more robust with the ability to withstand strong gusts of wind. Various types of kites exist, and they can be manoeuvred using a single line, dual lines, or even multiple lines. At kite festivals, the most common kites seen are the deltas, diamonds, cellulars, sleds, rokkakus, stunts, tractions, inflatables, and parafoils. Their vibrant colors and amazing designs are a sight to behold. Many countries hold an annual Kite Festival or National Kite Month. Flying kites in some countries is considered a sacred ritual. The Maori people often make their kites in the shape of a bird, as they believe birds can carry messages between humans and gods. Many great movies and stories have used kite-flying as a theme. In the 1964 Walt Disney’s American musical fantasy film, “Mary Poppins.” Another example is “Kite…The Messenger,” a short Indian film by Partha Sarathi Manna. 'If the world is one, then why the borders are created? If the colour of the Blood is Red, then why the Hearts are different? If there is one Religion of Humanity, then why this Hatred?' “A Christmas Memory,” a 1966 Emmy Winner by Truman Capote, is yet another short story that is based on hope and the magic of kites. It seems that kite flying is not only a beloved entertaining pastime, but also for many people, symbolizes a carefree and peaceful life, and perhaps a connection to something higher.
Културни следи по света
2021-04-14   807 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-04-14

Croatia: A Crossroads of Precious Cultures, Part 2 of 3

16:32

Croatia: A Crossroads of Precious Cultures, Part 2 of 3

Croatia is home to approximately 444 protected areas, including eight national parks, two strict nature reserves, and 11 nature parks, totaling an estimated 9% of the country’s land. Among these is the Plitvice Lakes National Park, which is unique for its exceptional beauty and attracts many nature lovers every year. When speaking of Croatia’s natural wonders, another location must be mentioned: the island of Lošinj. For hundreds of years, it has been renowned for its miraculous healing properties.An estimated 14 elements of Croatian culture have been added to the UNESCO Intangible Culture Heritage of Humanity lists, including traditional Croatian music, dance, art, and festivals. The country’s folk music and dances are unique, and its traditional music and instruments are jewels that have been preserved and handed down for generations by the Croats. The Tamburica is one of Croatia’s most popular national instruments. The diple, a woodwind, is another traditional musical instrument that is popular in Croatia. Croatia is home to several rich traditional singing styles, such as the Klapa, Ojkanje, the Istrian scale, and Bećarac, which are all included on the UNESCO Intangible Culture Heritage of Humanity lists. Beautiful folk dances are normally accompanied by folk music, but the Croatian dance Nijemo Kolo is special. This Dalmatian hinterland circle dance is performed without music. Some other traditional dances are Bunjevac, Posavina kolo, and Dubrovnik, which are each popular in their respective areas of Croatia. Croatia has many colorful festivals related to religion, and some are on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity list. Included on UNESCO’s list in 2009, the traditional carnival bell ringers’ pageant in the Kastav area is celebrated each January. The Procession of Za Križen (Following the Cross) is a Christian ritual that is performed every Maundy Thursday on the Dalmatian island of Hvar. Maundy Thursday is the Thursday before the Christian holiday of Easter and commemorates the Washing of the Feet (Maundy), and the Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles.
Културни следи по света
2021-06-02   775 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-06-02

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 2 of 2

14:57

The Indigenous People of Venezuela – Guardians of the Land, Part 2 of 2

Today we will continue to explore more aboriginal groups in this great country. The Orinoco River is the longest river in South America. The river created the Orinoco basin, a fascinating place with landscapes untouched by colonization. The people of the Basin still keep their indigenous housing styles and use canoes to travel. The Warao tribe is the guardian of the Orinoco River. The word Warao means “the boat people," which reflects their direct relationship with the river. Some live in palafitos, which are thatched huts on stilts above the water. Because the palafitos resemble similar architectural features in Venice, the land was named Venezuela by the Spanish explorer, Alonso de Ojeda, which means “Little Venice.” West of the Orinoco River, in the Llanos region, are the Guahibo and Yaruro tribes. They live in huts made of wild plantain leaves, as well as Jessenia and other palm leaves. The Yaruro are a mobile tribe, moving between the two dry and wet seasons. Their homes use Moriche palms as the main material for thatching the roofs, with Zinc lamina also used on some buildings. The Yanomami tribe lives as a community under a large round-shaped shelter called “Shabonos,” which is made from natural materials such as leaves, vines, and tree trunks.The Los Roques Archipelago consists of an estimated 350 islands north of the La Guaira port. In 1972, the Los Roques Archipelago National Park was created to protect this marine ecosystem of exceptional beauty, consisting of coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrass beds. The Guajira Peninsula is a territory along the Caribbean Coast known for a lively ecology, deep tropical rainforests, an abundance in biodiversity, plentiful clean water, and plenty of fresh air. The El Limón River in Venezuela is the main water source for the Wayuú tribes. Artificial ponds were developed to hold rainwater during the rainy season. Wayuú people have traditional crafts, such as making a variety of styles of bags, or mochilas. The Wayuú women have inherited a strong weaving tradition from their ancestors who, according to legend, learned it from a mythical spider called Walekeru.
Културни следи по света
2021-08-04   762 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-08-04

Croatia: A Crossroads of Precious Cultures, Part 3 of 3

15:53

Croatia: A Crossroads of Precious Cultures, Part 3 of 3

Today, we’ll continue to explore the country’s customs in regard to festivities, sports, crafts, agricultural products, and famous residents. Each spring on Whitsunday, the Procession of Queens is performed by young girls from the village of Gorjani in the Slavonia region of northeastern Croatia. Whitsunday is the 7th Sunday after Easter and it commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon Christ’s disciples. Since the year 972 AD the Festivity of Saint Blaise, the patron saint of Dubrovnik, has been celebrated on February 3rd in Dubrovnik City. Football, or soccer, is Croatia’s favorite sport. The national football team is in the top ten in the FIFA World rankings as of 2020 and has many fans around the world. Other sports Croatian people enjoy are tennis, alpine skiing, swimming, table tennis, and chess. The artistic Croatian people express their inner beauty and talent through various folk handicrafts, which include the making of beautiful traditional costumes, lace, and wooden toys. Croatia’s main agricultural products include wheat, corn, barley, sugar beets, sunflowers, rapeseed, alfalfa, clover, potatoes, cabbage, onions, tomatoes, peppers, apples, plums, mandarins, grapes, and other crops. In particular, Croatian olive oil is among the world's best. In addition, Croatian culture is vegan friendly, with over 160,000 members of the population being vegetarians or vegans, and many traditional vegan dishes are widely available in restaurants.The beautiful land of Croatia is also the birthplace of some world-famous inventors and inventions. The parachute was invented and constructed by Fausto Veranzio from Sibenik, Croatia, and he was also the first man to perform tests with parachute jumps. Today countless people use pens in everyday life, but few know that the pen is named after its naturalized Croatian inventor Slavoljub Eduard Penkala.
Културни следи по света
2021-06-09   760 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-06-09

Celebrating International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples- Loving Efforts to Resolve the Climate Crisis

13:22

Celebrating International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples- Loving Efforts to Resolve the Climate Crisis

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is celebrated on August 9 annually, in recognition of the first meeting of the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations that took place in 1982. On this day, the United Nations reminds us of the Native people’s contributions to the world. Globally, we honor their precious efforts to preserve and protect the planet for generations to come. Our show today highlights important work by Indigenous peoples worldwide to bring awareness of the need to safeguard our earth in light of accelerating global warming. Indigenous people around the globe maintain a deep connection with Mother Earth. They tirelessly campaign and advocate for the planet’s respect and protection, as well as carry out rituals, prayers and sacred ceremonies to help Mother Nature maintain balance. They constantly remind us of our interconnectedness. It is through this intrinsic connection that Indigenous groups on all continents have been keenly aware of global warming and the toll that it is taking. Hence, many Indigenous communities have been speaking out, trying to wake up the world to take action to protect our Earth. Indeed, many scientists are issuing similar warnings about our environment and the urgent need to safeguard it. And many Indigenous cooperatives, associations, committees and organizations have been formed to address environmental degradation. The groups also help with climate change adaptation. More Indigenous people are also adopting the vegan diet to protect the environment because of an increased awareness that animal livestock production is inherently cruel as well as the worst polluter and desecrator of the Earth. With the continued efforts of our Indigenous brothers and sisters, the future for our planet is becoming more optimistic!
Културни следи по света
2020-08-08   759 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2020-08-08

Traditional Music Instrument: The Bandoneon, Part 2 of 2

14:07

Traditional Music Instrument: The Bandoneon, Part 2 of 2

Both Ernst-Louis Arnold and Alfred Arnold were among the few notable bandoneon manufacturers in the early 20th century whose instruments are still highly valued and sought after today. After 1945, Alfred Arnold’s company was expropriated and nationalized to produce diesel engine parts, thus ended the mass production of bandoneons. Consequently, the instrument became a collectors’ item in Argentina. The shortage of new bandoneons in Argentina, coupled with the high selling price of instruments from Europe, deter students from buying them. Also, restoring old bandoneons and keeping them alive is becoming more challenging because of integral damage issues. These factors have prompted some local bandoneon restorers and tuners to resort to creating new instruments.Juan Pablo Fredes in Argentina is credited with making bandoneon variations that are suitable for children to play with their tiny hands. These smaller and lighter instruments are made from materials sourced for the lowest possible cost, while simultaneously striving to replicate the sound of the Double A bandoneon. His goals are to make the instrument easily accessible to everyone, and to facilitate the training of young performers, hence pricing them between 1,500 and 2,000 pesos (about US$16 and $20).Though the bandoneon is less than 200 years old, it has quite an array of prominent musicians. Let’s have a look at some of them. A pioneer of the bandoneon, Pedro Maffia, was one of the first to play the instrument a cappella. He invented the techniques of displaced accents, phrasing, and rubato. As a music teacher, he also created an important method of teaching the instrument. Next is one of the legends of tango music in Argentina, Aníbal Troilo, nicknamed Pichuco, whose more than 400 recordings and dozens of original compositions, established the basic sound of the tango. Several of his songs such as “Barrio de Tango” and “Sur” became tango standards. His orchestra is best known for its instrumentals. He inspired many younger players, including the famed progressive composer Astor Piazzolla. For his immense contribution to Argentina’s cultural fabric, his birth date was selected to commemorate the bandoneon in 2005. Bandoneon Day is celebrated on July 11 every year in Argentina.
Културни следи по света
2021-05-19   718 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-05-19

Indigenous Folk Tales of Jeju Island, Seolmundae Halmang and Goddesses

17:07

Indigenous Folk Tales of Jeju Island, Seolmundae Halmang and Goddesses

Jeju, which means “a town across the sea,” is the largest island in Korea. At the center of the island lies Hallasan, the highest mountain in Korea which reaches 1,947 meters above sea level. In addition to Hallasan National Park, designated as a UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site. Since ancient times, Hallasan has been worshiped as a sacred mountain where the gods and deities reside. Seolmundae Halmang is a goddess who is said to have created Jeju Island. Halmang means grandmother in the Jeju dialect. “It is said that long ago, Seolmundae Halmang built Hallasan mountain and Jeju Island by carrying stones and soil in the hem of her skirt and pouring it into the middle of the sea. The meaning of Halla is ‘a mountain that pulls the Milky Way.’ When Seolmundae Halmang first made Mt. Halla, it was like you can touch Milky Way from the top of the Mountain.” “It can be said that the legend reveals the existence of the female myth before the myths of patriarchy were formed. So, for example, before the male-centered myths were formed in the Bronze Age or Iron Age, there were stories of women who ruled over humans.” It is believed that there are 18,000 gods in Jeju. Among them is Yeongdeung Halmang who is the goddess of the winds and the sea. “It is believed that Yeongdeung Halmang, the goddess of wind, crosses this sea and sows the seeds of abundance in Jeju Island, bringing the energy of spring and life.” “Jeju Island has a lot of stories about goddesses.” There is also a story about a vegan goddess who only ate tree fruit. “The heart of the goddess who cherishes life is still passed down as a story among people like this.” Jeju, which has been blessed by many gods, preserves its clean and beautiful nature. Jeju is also taking the lead in adopting clean energy for a sustainable future and environmental preservation. In 2009, Supreme Master Ching Hai remotely participated in the international conference “Children’s Health & Sustainable Planet” held in Jeju, and spoke about the province’s beautiful nature and people. “We have just been exchanging notes and I’m sure if I go there today or another day I would absolutely enjoy the company of your people, and the fresh air and the unique landscape, and the tall mountain and sparkling sea that your island possesses, and the warm people of Korea that I had many times the honor to experience. I love Korea. I love Korean people. I truly do.”
Културни следи по света
2021-12-22   709 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-12-22

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 2 of 3

14:38

Afghanistan: Ancient Culture and Beautiful Heritage, Part 2 of 3

The first traces of human life in Afghanistan were found around 52,000 years ago. The earliest Afghan metal handicrafts can be traced back to the Bronze Age (3,300 to 1,200 BC). Also, over 20,600 gold items, such as coins, necklaces and other jewelry were found in burial mounds in Sheberghan, Jowzjan Province. Another significant form of art in Afghanistan is Gandharan art, a Buddhist art style developed during the 1st and 7th centuries AD. The Buddhas of Bamiyan were two monumental statues of Vairocana Buddha and Gautama Buddha that had been carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamiyan valley of central Afghanistan during the Hephthalites' time. Unfortunately, both statues were destroyed in 2001, leaving huge vacant spaces. In 2003, the Bamiyan Valley was included on UNESCO's World Heritage List and the List of World Heritage in Danger. Later, the art in Afghanistan was deeply influenced by Persian and Islamic culture. Grand mosques were built in the country featuring elaborate tiling styles. Many of these styles and techniques were influenced by Uzbek and Chinese ceramics. Afghanistan is the only place that can produce pottery artwork in this turquoise color. Embroidery and fabric handicrafts are traditional arts practiced throughout the history of Afghanistan and are typically done by women and girls. Each of Afghanistan’s ethnic groups has its own specific style of traditional embroidery. The unique embroidery called Khamak is a trademark of the southern city of Kandahar, and is considered by art experts to be one of the world’s finest embroidery forms. Afghanistan’s traditional clothing is quite conservative. For women, an ankle-length dress is worn with loose-fitting trousers called a tunbaan. A headscarf known as a chador is then worn to cover their hair. The men wear a similar basic outfit consisting of trousers and a loose-fitting shirt with a turban that differs according to where he is from. This clothing style dates back to the early medieval period and the time when Islamic culture was adopted. In 2006 the first Afghan fashion show was held in Kabul, thus opening a new era of traditional fashion in Afghanistan.
Културни следи по света
2021-10-20   707 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-10-20

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Rubab of Afghanistan

14:48

Traditional Musical Instrument: The Rubab of Afghanistan

How did musical instruments come about and what inspired their ingenious inventors? Supreme Master Ching Hai once revealed the following knowledge to us: “In ancient times, the spiritual practitioners who are connected to Heaven, at times tried to replicate the mesmerizing, wonderful music of the celestial abode by creating instruments. So, many of the instruments we have –like the harp, the piano, the violin, the flute, the Scottish bagpipes, etc. – they all correlate with the sounds of real Heavenly realms, except the real ones are much more incredibly uplifting.” The rubab, one of Afghanistan’s national musical instruments, is affectionately called “The lion of instruments.” The rubab comes in three varieties, the Afghan Kabuli rubab, the Northern Indian Seni rebab and the Tajikistan Pamiri rubab. The smooth, rhythmic, and ethereal sound of the rubab is so uplifting that the venerated Sufi Master and poet Rumi described it as the sound of the Heavenly gates opening the doorway to spiritual enlightenment. Rumi said: “‘He is all-forgiving’ are the words that I hear from the tone of the rebab. The heart-rending strains of paradise I hear from the tone of the rebab. The difference between the way you listen and the way I do, is that for you, the doors of your heart close, for me, the doors open with the tone of the rebab.” This ancient instrument has a history that dates back thousands of years. It’s confirmed to have existed during the 7th century CE and is mentioned widely in ancient Persian literature as well as in numerous Sufi poems. The heavenly sound of the rubab results from its unique construction and the way it’s played. Various sizes of rubab exist, ranging from small, to medium, to large and having 5, 19 and 21 strings respectively. The renowned and highly esteemed Afghan musician Mohammad Omar was Afghanistan’s first rubab performer who excelled in playing the instrument and was awarded the official title of Ustâd in 1949. Another impressive Afghan rubab performer is Ustâd Homayun Sakhi who is from one of Afghanistan’s famous musical families. Homayun is recognized as the current leading master in the rubab arena and is a well-known international rubab virtuoso. He has collaborated with celebrated musicians around the globe and created various passionate compositions.
Културни следи по света
2021-11-10   609 Преглед
Културни следи по света
2021-11-10
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